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Q U I C K   L I N K S

Please note that this is a list of primary works actually cited at She-philosopher.​com, and not a complete bibliography of “works consulted”; nor is it intended to be a list of suggested readings for the subjects dealt with here. My purpose is not to demonstrate core competence in a field of study, but to engage more deeply with authors, ideas, arguments, and esoteric texts that either teach me or electrify me (the sociable scholar ideal ;-). These days, I choose what to study and whom to engage based on my own eclectic scholarly interests & obsessions. And in so choosing, I now place renewed emphasis on primary over secondary texts, as is further explained here.

For She-philosopher.​com’s selective list of Secondary Sources, click/tap here.

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To experience a truer transcription of the look-and-feel of early-modern typography (in this case, for a text first printed in 1705), see She-philosopher.​com’s digital edition of Robert Hooke’s “Lecture explicating the Memory, and how we come by the notion of Time” (read at meetings of the Royal Society, May–June 1682).

N O T E

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First Published:  April 2004
Revised (substantive):  14 August 2017

A | B–E | F–J | K–O | P–T | U–Z |

ornament  primary texts: A

Acosta, José de. The naturall and morall historie of the East and West Indies. Intreating of the remarkable things of heaven, of the elements, mettalls, plants, and beasts which are proper to that country: together with the manners, ceremonies, lawes, governments, and warres of the Indians. Written in Spanish by Joseph Acosta, and translated into English by E. G. London: Printed by Val: Sims for Edward Blount and William Aspley, 1604.

Acosta, José de. The natural & moral history of the Indies. Reprinted from the English translated edition of Edward Grimston, 1604, and edited with notes and an introduction, by Clements R. Markham. 2 vols. Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, vols. 60–61. 1880; New York: B. Franklin, [n.d.].

Aesop. Æsop’s fables, English and Latine. Every one whereof is divided into its distinct periods, marked with figures; so that little children being used to write and translate them, may not onely more exactly understand all the rules of grammar but also learn to imitate the right composition of words, and the proper forms of speech, belonging to both languages. By Charles Hoole, Mr. in Arts, L.C. Oxon; and teacher of a private grammar school, in the Token-House in Lothbury, near the Royall Exchange, London. London: Printed by W. Wilson, for the Company of Stationers, 1657.

Algarotti, Francesco. Il newtonianismo per le dame. Naples, 1737.

Ames, Joseph. A catalogue of English heads: or, An account of about two thousand prints, describing what is peculiar on each; as the name, title, or office of the person. The habit, posture, age, or time when done. The name of the painter, graver, scraper, etc. And some remarkable particulars relating to their lives. By Joseph Ames, F.R.S. and secretary to the Society of Antiquaries. London: Printed by W. Faden for the editor, and sold by J. Robinson, at the Golden Lion in Ludgate-Street, MDCCXLVIII [1748].

Anon. A book of drawing, limning, washing or colouring of maps and prints: and the art of painting, with the names and mixtures of colours used by the picture-drawers. Or, the young-mans time well spent. In which, he hath the ground-work to make him fit for doing any thing by hand, when he is able to draw well. By the use of this work, you may draw all parts of a man, leggs, armes, hands and feet, severally, and together. And directions for birds, beasts, landskips, ships, and the like. Moreover you may learn by this tract, to make all sorts of colours; and to grinde and lay them: and to make colours out of colours: and to make gold and silver to write with. How also to diaper and shadow things, and to heighthen them, to stand off: to deepen them, and make them glister. In this book you have the necessary instruments for drawing, and the use of them, and how to make artificiall pastels to draw withall. Very usefull for all handicrafts, and ingenuous gentlemen and youths. London: Printed by M. Simmons for Thomas Jenner, and are to be sold at his shop, at the south entrance of the Royal Exchange, 1652.

This is the 2nd edition of Compton Holland’s The Booke of the Art of Drawing (originally issued by Holland between 1616 and 1620), and retitled Albert Durer Revived ... when published by John Garrett in 1679.

Anon. Albert Durer revived: or, a book of drawing, limning, washing or colouring of maps and prints. And the art of painting, with the names and mixtures of colours used by the picture-drawers. Or, the young-mans time well spent. In which he hath the ground-work to make him fit for doing any thing by hand, when he is able to draw well. By the use of this work, you may draw all parts of a man, leggs, armes, hands and feet, severally and together. And directions for birds, beasts, landskips, ships, and the like. Moreover, grounds to lay silver or gold upon; and how silver or gold shall be laid or limned upon size, and the way to temper gold and silver, and other mettals, and divers kinds of colours, to write, or to limne withal, upon vellume, parchment, or paper, and how to lay them upon the work which you intend to make; and how to varnish it, when you have done. How also to diaper and shadow things, and to highten them, to stand off: to deepen them, and make them glister. In this book, you have the necessary instruments for drawing, and the use of them; and how to make artificial pastiles to draw withall. And also directions, how to draw with Indian ink: wherein you have also Mr. Hollars receipt for etching, with instructions how to use it. Very useful for all handicrafts, and ingenuous gentlemen and youths. London: Printed by S. and B. Griffin, for John Garrett ..., [1679].

Anon. Albert Durer revived: or, a Book of drawing, limning, washing, or colouring of maps and prints: and the art of painting, with the names and mixtures of colours used by the picture-drawers. With directions how to lay and paint pictures upon glass. Or, The young-man’s time well spent. In which he hath the ground-work to make him fit for doing any thing by hand, when he is able to draw well. By the use of this work you may draw all parts of a man, legs, arms, hands, and feet, severally and together. And directions for birds, beasts, landskips, ships, and the like. Moreover, grounds to lay silver or gold upon, and how silver and gold shall be laid or limned upon size, and the way to temper gold and silver, and other mettals, and divers kinds of colours, to write, or to limn withal, upon vellum, parchment, or paper, and how to lay them upon the work which you intend to make, and how to varnish it when you have done. How also to diaper and shadow things, and to heighten them, to stand off: to deepen them, and make them glister. In this book you have the necessary instruments for drawing, and the use of them, and how to make artificial pastils to draw withal. And also directions how to draw with Indian ink: wherein you have also Mr. Hollars receipt for etching, with instructions how to use it. Very useful for all handicrafts, and ingenuous gentlemen and youths. London: printed by I. Dawks, for John Garrett, at his shop as you go up the stairs of the Royal Exchange in Cornhill, where you may have choice of all sorts of large and small maps, coloured or uncoloured, variety of Dutch and French prints, and prints done in metzo tincto, very good Indian ink to draw withal, and all sorts of the best copy-books, and Cocker’s Tutor to writing and Arithmetick, being a new and most easie method, so easie that the meanest capacity may understand it at the first sight, and several sorts of coloured sashes to set before windows, [c.1697].

Anon. The book of curiosities of the sciences and marvels for the eyes. Arabic MS. copy, dating from the late 12th or early 13th century, of an illustrated anonymous cosmography, compiled in Egypt during the first half of the 11th century.

A complete digital edition of The Book of Curiosities is available at a dedicated website mounted by The Bodleian Library in collaboration with The Oriental Institute, University of Oxford. “The website contains an electronic high-quality reproduction of all the folios of the original manuscript, linked by mouse-overs to an Arabic edition and an annotated English translation of the text of the treatise as well as the labels on the maps. The site also allows users to search for English and Arabic terms, consult an extensive glossary, and study explanatory diagrams.”
   This fascinating manuscript “contains a unique series of maps and diagrams, most of which are unparalleled in any other medieval work. These include diagrams of star-groups and comets; a rectangular map of the world with a graphic scale (the earliest surviving example of such a map); a circular world map; individual maps of islands and ports in the eastern Mediterranean, including Sicily, Tinnis, Mahdia, Cyprus, and the Byzantine coasts of Asia Minor; maps illustrating the Mediterranean Sea as a whole, the Indian Ocean, and the Caspian Sea; and maps of five major rivers (the Nile, Indus, Oxus, Euphrates, and Tigris).”

Anon. Cabala, mysteries of state, in letters of the great ministers of K. James and K. Charles. Wherein much of the publique manage of affaires is related. Faithfully collected by a noble hand. London: Printed for M. M., G. Bedell, and T. Collins, and are to be sold at their Shop at the Middle-Temple Gate in Fleetstreet, 1654.

Includes a transcription (c.1623), by Leonell Sharpe, of Elizabeth I’s celebrated Armada speech, delivered on 9 August 1588 to the English troops at Tilbury.
   Three 17th-century versions (including Sharpe’s, as printed here) of Elizabeth I’s speech rallying the troops have been digitized for the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. ELIZ1588.

Anon. Eikon basilike. The pourtraicture of His sacred Majestie in his solitudes and sufferings: together with his private prayers used in the time of his restraint delivered to D. Juxon, Bishop of London, immediately before his death. [London:] MDCXLIX [1649].

Anon. The law’s resolutions of women’s rights: or, the law’s provision for women. Ed. by T. E. London, 1632.

Anon. Letters and poems in honour of the incomparable princess, Margaret, dutchess of Newcastle. In the Savoy: Printed by Thomas Newcombe, 1676.

1st edn., printed after her death on 15 December 1673, and probably collected by Margaret Cavendish’s grieving husband, William, 1st duke of Newcastle (d. 25 December 1676).
   The 1676 laudatory was reissued in 1678 with a new title and imprint: A collection of letters and poems: written by several persons of honour and learning, upon divers important subjects, to the late duke and dutchess of Newcastle. London: Printed for Langly Curtis, 1678.

Anon. The modest critick; or Remarks upon the most eminent historians, antient and modern. With useful cautions and instructions as well for writing, as reading history: wherein the sense of the greatest men on this subject is faithfully abridged. By one of the Society of the Port-Royal. London: Printed for William Witwood in Duck-Lane, and Mrs. Feltham in Westminster-Hall, 1691.

Aristotle. Nicomachean ethics. Trans. by W. D. Ross. In The basic works of Aristotle. Ed. by Richard McKeon. New York: Random House, 1941.

Ross’ canonical English translation of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (written 350 B.C.E.) is available online at MIT’s The Internet Classics Archive.

Aristotle. Rhetoric. Trans. by W. Rhys Roberts. In The basic works of Aristotle. Ed. by Richard McKeon. New York: Random House, 1941.

Roberts’ canonical English translation of Aristotle’s Rhetoric (written 350 B.C.E.) is available online at MIT’s The Internet Classics Archive.

Ashmole, Elias. The institution, laws & ceremonies of the most noble Order of the Garter. Collected and digested into one body by Elias Ashmole of the Middle-Temple Esq; Windesor Herald at Arms. A work furnished with a variety of matter, relating to honor and noblesse. London: Printed by J. Macock, for Nathanael Brooke at the Angel in Cornhill, near the Royal Exchange, MCCLXXII [1672].

Astell, Mary. A Serious Proposal to the Ladies for the Advancement of Their True and Greatest Interest. London, 1694.

The Athenian Society. The Athenian gazette, or casuistical mercury, resolving all the most nice and curious questions proposed by the ingenious of either sex. 20 vols. London: Printed for P. Smart, 1691–1697.

The Athenian Society. The young-students-library. Containing, extracts and abridgments of the most valuable books printed in England, and in the forreign journals, from the year sixty five, to this time. To which is added, a new essay upon all sorts of learning; wherein the use of the sciences is distinctly treated on. By the Athenian Society. Also, a large alphabetical table, comprehending the contents of this volume. And of all the Athenian Mercuries and supplements, &c. printed in the year 1691. Ed. by John Dunton. London: Printed for John Dunton, at the Raven in the Poultry. Where is to be had the intire sett of Athenian Gazettes, and the supplements to ’em for the year, 1691. bound up all together, (with the alphabetical table to the whole year) or else in separate volumes, (or single Mercuries to this time), 1692.

Aubrey, John. “Brief lives,” chiefly of contemporaries, set down by John Aubrey, between the years 1669 & 1696; ed. from the author’s mss. by Andrew Clark .... 2 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1898.

Aubrey, John. Brief lives. Edited from the original manuscripts and with an introduction by Oliver Lawson Dick. 3rd edn. 1949; London: Secker and Warburg, 1960.

Aubrey, John. Idea of education, ms. begun in 1669 and completed c.1684. In Aubrey on education: a hitherto unpublished manuscript by the author of “Brief lives”. Transcribed and ed. by J. E. Stephens. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1972.

Aubrey, John. Miscellanies, viz. I. Day-fatality. II. Local-fatality. III. Ostenta. IV. Omens. V. Dreams. VI. Apparitions. VII. Voices. VIII. Impulses. IX. Knockings. X. Blows invisible. XI. Prophesies. XII. Marvels. XIII. Magick. XIV. Transportation in the air. XV. Visions in a beril or glass. XVI. Converse with angels angels and spirits. XVII. Corps-candles in Wales. XVIII. Oracles. XIX. Exstasie. XX. Glances of love [and] envy. XXI. Second-sighted persons. Collected by J. Aubrey, Esq;. London: Printed for Edward Castle, next Scotland-Yard-Gate by Whitehall, 1696.

Aubrey, John. The natural history of Wiltshire. Ed. by John Britton. London: Printed by J. B. Nichols and Son, 1847.

Aubrey, John, and Robert Hooke. Letter to Anthony Wood, postmarked 15 Sept. 1689, with MS. amendments and enclosure by Robert Hooke. Transcribed and printed in “Brief lives,” chiefly of contemporaries, set down by John Aubrey, between the years 1669 & 1696; ed. from the author’s mss. by Andrew Clark ... Ed. by Andrew Clark. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1898. i. 412–415.

A complete digital transcription of Aubrey’s letter, with Hooke’s enclosure, is available as a She-philosopher.​com 2nd-window aside for the introductory essay on Robert Hooke in THE PLAYERS section. You can link to it from there.

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ornament  primary texts: BE

B., R. Choice emblems, divine and moral, ancient and modern: or delights for the ingenious, in above fifty select emblems, curiously ingraven upon copper plates. With fifty pleasant poems and lots, by way of lottery, for illustrating each emblem, to promote instruction and good counsel by diverting recreation. London: Printed for Edmund Parker, at the Bible and Crown in Lombard-street, 1721.

B., R. The English empire in America: or a prospect of His Majesties dominions in the West-Indies. Namely, Newfoundland, New-England, New-York, Pensylvania, New-Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, Carolina, Bermuda’s, Barbuda, Anguilla, Monstserrat, Dominica, St. Vincent, Antego, Mevis or Nevis, S. Christophers, Barbadoes, Jamaica. With an account of the discovery, scituation, product, and other excellencies of these countries. To which is prefixed a relation of the first discovery of the New World called America, by the Spaniards. And of the remarkable voyages of several Englishmen to divers places therein. Illustrated with maps and pictures. By R. B., author of Englands monarchs, &c., Admirable curiosities in England, &c., Historical remarks of London, &c., The late wars in England, &c., and The history of Scotland and Ireland. London: Printed for Nath. Crouch at the Bell in the Poultrey near Cheapside, 1685.

B., R. Surprizing miracles of nature & art, in two parts. Containing I. Miracles of nature, or the strange signs and prodigious appearances in the heavens, earth, and waters for many hundred years past. With the most famous comets and prodigies since the birth of our Saviour, and the effects of many of them: as also a particular description of the five blazing stars seen in England, in 1664, 1665, 1680, 1682. and other unaccountable accidents and productions. II. Miracles of art, describing the most magnificent buildings, and curious inventions in all ages, as Solomons temple, the seven wonders of the world, and other famous structures and rarities. Beautified with pictures. By R. B. The third edition. London: printed for Nath. Crouch at the Bell in the Poultrey, near Cheapside, 1699.

Bacon, Francis. Francisci de Verulamio, summi angliæ cancellarii, Instauratio magna. Londini: Apud [Bonham Norton and] Ioannem Billium typographum regium, 1620.

Bacon, Francis. New Atlantis. A work unfinished. Written by the right honourable, Francis, Lord Verulam, Viscount St. Alban. 1627; rpt. London: Printed by Tho: Newcomb, 1659.

Bacon, Francis. Of the advancement and proficience of learning or the partitions of sciences IX bookes. Written in Latin by the most eminent illustrious & famous Lord Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam Vicont St Alban Counsilour of Estate and Lord Chancellor of England. Interpreted by Gilbert Wats. Oxford: Printed by Leon: Lichfield, printer to the University, for Rob: Young, [London], & Ed. Forrest [, Oxford], MDXL [1640].

Bacon, Francis. Sylva sylvarum: or a naturall historie in ten centuries. Written by the right honourable Francis Lo. Verulam Viscount St. Alban. Published after the authors death, by William Rawley doctor of divinitie, late his lordships chaplaine. London: Printed by J[ohn] H[aviland and Augustine Mathewes] for William Lee at the the Turks Head in Fleet-street, next to the Miter, 1626 [i.e., 1627].

Bacon, Roger. Frier Bacon his discovery of the miracles of art, nature, and magick. Faithfully translated out of Dr Dees own copy, by T. M. and never before in English. London: Printed for Simon Miller at the Starre in St Pauls Church-yard, 1659.

Baldwin, William, rev. Thomas Palfreyman. A treatise of morall philosophie: wherein is contained the worthy sayings of philosophers[,] emperours, kings, and orators: their lives and answers: of what linage they came: and of what countrey they were: whose worthy sentences[,] notable precepts, counsels, and parables, doe hereafter follow. First gathered & set forth by William Bauldwin, and now the ninthtime [sic] since inlarged by Thomas Palfreyman, gentleman. London: Printed by William Stansby, [c.1635].

Banister, John. An antidotarie chyrurgicall, containing great varietie and choice of all sorts of medicines that commonly fal into the chyrurgions use: partlie taken out of authors, olde and new, printed or written: partlie obtained by free gifte of sundrie worthie men of this profession within this land. By John Banester master in chirurgerie. Imprinted at London: By Thomas Orwin for Thomas Man, 1589.

Barker, Jane. Poetical recreations: consisting of original poems, songs, odes, &c. With several new translations. In two parts. Part I. Occasionally written by Mrs. Jane Barker. Part II. By several gentlemen of the universities, and others. London: Printed for Benjamin Crayle, at the Peacock and Bible, at the west-end of St. Pauls, 1688.

Bate, John. The mysteryes of nature and art: conteined in foure severall tretises. The first of water workes[.] The second of fyer workes. The third of drawing, colouring, painting, and engraving. The fourth of divers experiments, as wel serviceable as delightful: partly collected, and partly of the authors peculiar practice, and invention by J. B. Imprinted at London: [By Thomas Harper] for Ralph Mab and are to be sold by John Jackson and Francis Church at the Kings armes in Cheapeside, 1634.

Baudoin, Jean. Iconologie, ou Explication nouvelle de plusieurs images, emblemes, et autres figures hyerogliphiques des vertus, des vices, des arts, des sciences, des causes naturelles, des humeurs differentes, & des passions humaines. Oeuvre augmentee d’une seconde partie; necessaire a toute sorte d’esprits, et particulierement a ceux qui aspirent a estre, ou qui sont en effet orateurs, poetes, sculpteurs, peintres, ingenieurs, autheurs de medailled, de devises, de ballets, & de poëmes dramatiques. Tirée des recherches & des figures de Cesar Ripa, moralisées par J. Baudoin. Paris: M. Guillemot, 1644.

Behn, Aphra, trans. “Book VI. Of Trees, by Mrs. A. Behn.” In The third part of the works of Mr Abraham Cowley, being his Six books of plants, never before printed in English: viz. The first and second of herbs. The third and fourth of flowers. The fifth and sixth of trees. Now made English by several hands. With a necessary index. Licensed and entered. London: Printed for Charles Harper, at the Flower-de-luce over against S. Dunstan’s Church in Fleet-street, 1689. 131–166.

Behn, Aphra, trans. and introd. A discovery of new worlds. To which is prefixed a preface by way of essay on translated prose; wherein the arguments of Father Tacquet, and others, against the system of Copernicus (as to the motion of the earth) are likewise considered and answered. Wholly new. By Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle. London: Printed for William Canning, 1688.

Behn, Aphra, trans. and introd. A discovery of new worlds. By Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle. London, 1688. Rpt. in vol. 4 of The works of Aphra Behn. 7 vols. Ed. by Janet Todd. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1992–.

Behn, Aphra. The emperor of the moon: a farce. As it is acted by Their Majesties servants at the Queens Theatre. Written by Mrs. A. Behn. London: Printed by R. Holt for Joseph Knight and Francis Saunders ..., 1687.

Behn, Aphra. The emperor of the moon, a farce. As it is acted by Their Majesties servants at the Queens Theatre. Written by Mrs. A. Behn. 2nd edn. London: Printed by R. Holt, for Joseph Knight, and Francis Saunders ..., 1688.

Behn, Aphra. The emporer of the moon. 1687. Rpt. in vol. 7 of The works of Aphra Behn. 7 vols. Ed. by Janet Todd. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1992–?.

Behn, Aphra. Sir Patient Fancy: a comedy. As it is acted at the Duke’s Theatre. Written by Mrs. A. Behn. London: Printed by E. Flesher for Richard Tonson ... and Jacob Tonson ..., 1678.

Behn, Aphra, trans. and introd. The theory or system of several new inhabited worlds lately discovered and pleasantly describ’d in five nights conversation with Madam the Marchioness of ***. Written in French by the famous Mons. Fontanelle. Made English by Mrs. Behn. London: Printed by W. O. for Sam. Briscoe ..., 1700.

Benlowes, Edward. Theophila, or, Loves sacrifice. A divine poem. Written by E. B., Esq; several parts thereof set to fit aires by Mr. J. Jenkins. Longum iter per præcepta, breve & efficax per exempla. Si præceptis non accendimur, saltem exemplis incitemur, atq in appetitu rectitudinis nil sibi mens nostra difficile æstimet, quod perfectè peragi ab aliis videt. Greg. Mag. l.9. c.43. Id peragas vitâ, quod velles morte peractum. London: Printed by R. N., sold by Henry Seile in Fleetstreet, and Humphrey Moseley at the Princes Arms in S. Pauls Church-yard, 1652.

[Bible / The Bishops’ Bible.]  The. holie. Bible. conteynyng the olde Testament and the newe. Imprinted at London: In powles Churchyarde by Richarde Jugge, printer to the Queenes Majestie, cum privilegio Regiae Majestatis, [1568].

1st folio edn. (printed in 1568 by Richard Jugge) of the version of the bible known as the “Bishops’ Bible” (also: the “Treacle Bible,” and the “Gentlemen’s Bible”). The English translation was overseen by Matthew Parker (1504–1575), Archbishop of Canterbury, with the assistance of many bishops and well-known Biblical scholars. “The work seems to have been carried out in separate sections, which vary considerably in value. In correcting the Great Bible, both the Hebrew and Greek originals were consulted. The influence of the Geneva version appears, especially in the prophetical books; while Castalio was also consulted. Westcott considers that the Greek attainments of the reviewers were superior to their Hebrew, and that the alterations in the New Testament show original and vigorous scholarship.” (T. H. Darlow and H. F. Moule, 1903, 69)

[Bible / The Clementine Vulgate.]  Biblia sacra Vulgatæ editionis, Sixti V. Pont. Max. iussu recognita: et Clementis VIII. auctoritate edita. Parisiis: e Typographia regia., M. DC. LIII [1653].

A mid-17th-century edn. of the Latin Vulgate Clementine Bible, printed at Paris in 1653, with Nicolas Poussin’s celebrated allegorical frontispiece, engraved by Claude Mellan.
   The Clementine Vulgate “is the edition most familiar to Catholics who have lived prior to the liturgical reforms following Vatican II.
   “After the Reformation, when the Catholic Church strove to counter the attacks and refute the doctrines of Protestantism, the Vulgate was reaffirmed in the Council of Trent as the sole, authorized Latin text of the Bible. To reinforce this declaration, the council commissioned the pope to make a standard text of the Vulgate out of the countless editions produced during the Renaissance and manuscripts produced during the Middle Ages. The actual first manifestation of this authorized text did not appear until 1590. It was sponsored by Pope Sixtus V (1585–90) and known as the Sistine Vulgate. It was based on the edition of Robertus Stephanus corrected to agree with the Greek, but it was hurried into print and suffered from many printing errors. It was soon replaced by a new edition by Clement VIII (1592–1605) who immediately ordered corrections and revisions to be made. This new revised version was based more on the Hentenian edition. It is called today the Sixto-Clementine Vulgate, or simply the Clementine, although it is Sixtus’ name which appears on the title page. Clement published three printings of this edition, in 1592, 1593 and 1598.
   “The Clementine differed from the manuscripts on which it was ultimately based in that it grouped the various prefaces of St. Jerome together at the beginning, and it removed 3 and 4 Esdras and the Prayer of Manasses from the Old Testament and placed them in an appendix.
   “The Psalter of the Clementine Vulgate, like that of almost all earlier editions, is the Gallicanum.
   “The Clementine Vulgate of 1592 became the standard Bible text of the Roman Rite of the Roman Catholic Church until 1979, when the Nova Vulgata was promulgated.” (as described by the seller of a copy of the Biblia Sacra Vulgatae Editionis auctioned at eBay in January 2009)

[Bible / The Coverdale Bible.]  Biblia. The Bible, that is, the holy Scripture of the Olde and New Testament, faithfully and truly translated out of Douche and Latyn in to Englishe. [Antwerp?: Printed by Martin de Keyser?, for Jacob Van Meteren?], M.D.XXXV [1535].

The first printed, complete English Bible, translated by Miles Coverdale (1488–1568), and illuminated with 67 repeating small woodcuts (for 150 illustrations total). Unfortunately, every extant copy of the Coverdale Bible of 1535 is imperfect.
   In “the Dedication to Henry VIII Coverdale himself says: I have ... purely & faythfully translated this out of fyve sundry interpreters ...; so in the Prologue: And to helpe me herin, I have had sondrye translacions, not onely in latyn, but also of the Douche [German] interpreters: whom (because of theyr synguler gyftes & speciall diligence in the Bible) I have ben the more glad to folowe for the most parte. Thus Coverdale does not profess to have translated directly from the Hebrew and Greek originals. A careful examination of the text itself confirms this view, and enables us to ascertain, almost beyond doubt, that his fyve sundry interpreters were the Swiss-German version of Zwingli and Leo Juda (printed at Zurich 1524–29), the Latin version of Sanctes Pagninus (the first edition of which appeared in 1528), Luther’s German version (finished in 1532), the Vulgate, and Tindale [i.e., Tyndale’s New Testament]. In the main his translation is based on the first two of these.... Though his work does not rank beside Tindale’s, it was Coverdale’s glory ... to leave to posterity a permanent memorial of his genius in that more musical version of the Psalter [Goostly Psalmes and Spirituall Songs Drawen out of the Holy Scripture, 1535?] which passed into the Book of Common Prayer, and has endeared itself to generations of Englishmen.” (T. H. Darlow and H. F. Moule, 1903, 6–7)
   “Imitating the Swiss and German Bibles, Coverdale coined many compounds, some of which survive, like ‘winebibber’ at Proverbs 23: 20; or do not, like ‘unoutspeakable’ at Romans 8: 26; or should have done, like ‘wintercool’ at Proverbs 25: 13. He has favourite forms, like ‘tender mercies’, ‘lovingkindness’, and the excellent ‘saving health’. His love of variation he defended in his prologue to the reader as part of his pleasure in a variety of translations. He followed Tyndale in keeping firmly to ‘congregation’, ‘elder’, and ‘love’ and other central New Testament terms for which he had been so attacked, though he used ‘penance’ for ‘repentance’ occasionally, pointing out that the former does mean the turning of the whole being to God. His skill with synonyms was most helpful in the poetic and prophetic books of the second half of the Old Testament, untouched by Tyndale, where his grasp (it seems, intuitive) of the parallelism of Hebrew poetry, well ahead of other western translators, produced many splendid passages, such as ‘Seek ye the Lord while he may be found, call upon him while he is nigh’ (Isaiah 55: 6). To Coverdale’s 1535 Bible are owed many unforgettable phrases: ‘She brought forth butter in a lordly dish’ (Judges 5: 25); ‘By the waters of Babylon we sat down and wept when we remembered Sion’ (Psalm 137: 1); ‘enter thou into the joy of thy lord’ (Matthew 25: 21, 23); ‘the pride of life’ (1 John 2: 16); and many more.” (ODNB entry for Miles Coverdale by David Daniell, unpaginated)

[Bible / The English Hexapla.] Bagster, Samuel, comp. The English hexapla. Exhibiting the six important English translations of the New Testament Scriptures, Wiclif, M.CCC.LXXX., Tyndale, M.D.XXXIV., Cranmer, M.D.XXXIX., Genevan, M.D.LVII., Anglo-Rhemish, M.D.LXXXII., Authorised, M.DC.XI. The original Greek text after Scholz. With the various readings of the textus receptus and the principal Constantinopolitan and Alexandrine manuscripts, and a complete collation of Scholz’s text with Griesbach’s edition of M.DCCC.V.; preceded by an historical account of the English translations. London: Samuel Bagster and Sons, M.DCCC.XLI [1841].

[Bible / The Great Bible.]  The Byble in Englyshe, that is to saye the content of all the holy scrypture, bothe of ye olde and newe testament, truly translated after the veryte of the Hebrue and Greke textes, by ye dylygent studye of dyverse excellent learned men, expert in the forsayde tonges. [London]: Prynted by Rychard Grafton & Edward Whitchurch. Cum privilegio ad imprimendum solum, 1539.

The Great Bible of 1539 was a revision, by Miles Coverdale, of the whole Bible in English known from its title page as “Thomas Matthew’s Bible,” with its production overseen by Henry VIII’s powerful chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, who presided over Henry VIII’s break with the Roman Catholic church, over the dissolution of the monasteries, and over the beginning of the English Reformation.
   “During the relatively quiet winter months of 1538–9 ... Cromwell’s main concern was with the preparation of Coverdale’s Great Bible, in the final stages of production in Paris. On 17 December the inquisitor-general of France ordered work to cease, and Cromwell had to beg the French king to release the unfinished books so that printing might continue in England. Revealing his personal interest in the project he admitted to the French ambassador that he had contributed £400 of his own money. After much negotiation the presses, type, and workers were all transported to London in February 1539. The following month Cromwell also planned ‘a device in the Parliament for the unity in religion’, and seemed comfortable in discussing preparations with the king.... In April the first edition of the Great Bible was finally available, printed by Richard Grafton and Edward Whitchurch, two enthusiastic evangelicals. Cromwell had long been passionately interested in the Bible — he was said to have learned Erasmus’s translation of the New Testament by heart after buying a copy in 1517. The publication of the Great Bible was the culmination of his persistent pressure for an authoritative version in English, and represents one of his most significant achievements.” (ODNB entry for Thomas Cromwell by Howard Leithead, n. pag.)
   “The description ‘Great Bible’ is justified, since it measured 337 mm by 235 mm. The title-page now has a grand King Henry almost at the top, and the whole large picture demonstrates his largess in giving English bibles to every rank. For the text, Coverdale heavily revised ‘Matthew’s’ Bible, not his own original [i.e., the Coverdale Bible of 1535, which was not considered scholarly enough]. Some of his changes were no doubt frequently diplomatic, as he pointed out when he went back towards the Vulgate, and he severely reduced the number of marginal notes. Most of the changes were made because he was now able to use the translation of the Hebrew into Latin by Sebastian Münster, Germany’s leading Hebraist, printed in 1535. The steady current in the Old Testament is towards greater accuracy to the original, not to speak of intelligibility. For the New Testament he returned to Erasmus’s Latin. Coverdale continued to revise in two of the six successive editions, in those of April 1540 (with Cranmer’s preface for the first time) and of July 1540. The Psalms, however, received less revision from their 1535 version. Coverdale’s Psalms went forward to become the liturgical psalms of the reformed English church.” (ODNB entry for Miles Coverdale by David Daniell, unpaginated)

[Bible / The King James Bible.]  The Holy Bible, conteyning the Old Testament, and the New. Newly translated out of the originall tongues: & with the former translations diligently compared and revised, by his Majesties speciall com[m]andement. Appointed to be read in churches. Imprinted at London: by Robert Barker, printer to the Kings most Excellent Majestie, Anno Dom. 1611.

This is the editio princeps (printed at London in 1611) of the authorized English version known as The King James Bible.

[Bible / The Tyndale New Testament.]  [The New Testament.] [Cologne: H. Fuchs?, 1525.]

1st edn. of Tyndale’s New Testament (a quarto, printed at Cologne in 1525). This was the first vernacular English text of any part of the Bible to be published.
   About springtime 1523, William Tyndale (c.1494–1536) arrived in London “with the vocation to print the New Testament in English, and needing permission, hoped to be supported by Cuthbert Tunstall, the bishop of London.” Tunstall “snubbed Tyndale,” but did not persecute him. Having ascertained that “to translate the New Testament ... there was no place in all England,” Tyndale “left for Germany, probably in April 1524, supported by London merchants including Monmouth, who was in serious trouble in May 1528 because of that.” (ODNB entry for William Tyndale by David Daniell, n. pag.)
   Tyndale’s English translation of the New Testament was completed and put to the press in 1525. When Roman Catholic authorities raided the print shop at Cologne, Tyndale moved up the Rhone to continue printing at Worms. Tyndale was working on an Old Testament translation when he was captured in Antwerp, and executed at Vilvoorde in 1536. At the time of his death, several thousand copies of his New Testament had been printed, but after being prohibited by the English state, which systematically collected and destroyed the printed text, only one intact copy remains today at London’s British Library.
   From the original website page, accessed in 2002, for the Plantin-Moretus Museum’s 2002 exhibition, “Tyndale’s Testament,” which displayed Tyndale’s prison letter, along with a number of valuable English Bibles (some of them unique), the first complete French and Dutch bibles, and early Danish bibles, all produced at Antwerp during Tyndale’s time:
   “No age has been more crucial in the building of the English nation than that of the Tudors. It was a time of rapid economic growth and cultural achievement, but also a time of religious tension. During the reign of Henry VIII, there was a new sense of unity among the people thanks largely to the first protestant Bible translations in English. For the first time, people all over England heard a single English language, as the Bible was read aloud in churches from 1539 onwards. This determined a more or less definitive norm for a language unifying the nation: modern English. In addition, the first Bibles in print and the published comments upon them gave ordinary subjects access to new modes of independent political thinking. This stimulated the growth of a modern nation which in later times would be considered by many as the mother of modern parliaments and democracies.
   “The key figure in the translation of the first English Bible in print, the so-called Coverdale Bible of 1535, was William Tyndale. Between 1526 and 1538, Tyndale, his collaborators, and indeed his competitors did most of their work in Antwerp — a town which had sufficient commercial, intellectual and political openness to allow the English language and ‘nation’ to develop fully. In 1526, Tyndale had been forced to interrupt the printing of his first New Testament (translated from the Greek) in Cologne, and to flee to Worms, where the book was finally published. About a year later, he arrived in Antwerp, where he was to stay for eight years. It is here that he revised his New Testament, translated half the Old Testament, and published his polemical works.
   “In the preparation of these, the Antwerp printers and the humanism of the Low Countries played a vital role. No other town could have offered Tyndale as propitious an environment as Antwerp. Unfortunately, even here he was not beyond suspicion and persecution. In 1535, he was betrayed by a Leuven student of English origin, sent to him by the Bishop of London to trap him. He was coaxed out of the Antwerp merchant house where he had been safe for so long, arrested by the armsbearers of Charles V, incarcerated in Vilvoorde (north of Brussels), interrogated by Leuven theologians and found guilty of heresy, and at the beginning of September 1536, he was strangled and burnt at the stake. One letter survives from his prison days. It is the only surviving document of which we are certain that it was written in his own hand. In it he asks for a warmer hat and warmer clothes, and above all for his Hebrew grammar and dictionary, and his Hebrew Bible.” (n. pag.)

[Bible / The Tyndale New Testament.]  Tyndale, William, trans. The first printed English New Testament. Translated by William Tyndale. Photo-lithographed from the unique fragment, now in the Grenville collection, British Museum. Facs. rpt. Ed. by Edward Arber. London: Bloomsbury, 1871.

A late-19th-century facsimile reprint, with added scholarly commentary (Preface), of The Tyndale New Testament, as printed at Cologne in 1525.

[Bible / The Tyndale New Testament.]  The Newe Testamente. [Worms: n.p.,] M. D. XXVI [1526].

2nd edn. of Tyndale’s New Testament (an octavo, printed at Worms in 1526).
   This translation was surreptitiously published at a time when the circulation of the word of God in English was deemed heresy, possession of the scriptures in English was forbidden, and those who read the scriptures in English were persecuted, and if caught defying the authorities, could be sent to the stake.
   Bishop Tunstall’s prohibition of 23 October 1526 officially condemned Tyndale’s New Testament for its putative errors and wilful perversions in translating (“two thousand texts falsely translated,” according to Tunstall), and on grounds of being “blinded through extreme wickedness, wandering from the way of truth, and the catholic faith,” “intermeddling therewith many heretical articles and erroneous opinions, pernicious and offensive, seducing the simple people. This ‘pestiferous and most pernicious poison’ would, (the bishop said,) ... without doubt contaminate the flock committed to his charge with most deadly poison and heresy....” (The English Hexapla, comp. by Samuel Bagster, 1841, 46)
   Sir Thomas More, in his 1528 attack on Tyndale’s New Testament, claimed that there were one (rather than two) thousand texts falsely rendered (but again, like Tunstall, neglected to give details specifying the faults). More’s only “distinct charges against the translation are that ‘Priests,’ ‘Church,’ and ‘Charity,’ are translated ‘seniours,’ ‘congregacyon,’ and ‘love;’ and also that grace was sometimes rendered by favour, penance by repentance, and a contrite heart by a troubled heart. Such were the trifling reasons assigned for the prohibition and burning of [Tyndale’s] the New Testament....” (The English Hexapla, comp. by Samuel Bagster, 1841, 49)
   Because the Dutch printers were multiplying the copies of the English New Testament, in 1529, Bishop Tunstall purchased, in person, all copies of Tyndale’s New Testament which were for sale in Antwerp, and upon returning with them to London, had the books burned in May 1530. “So carefully were the distributed copies of the four first editions of Tyndale’s Testament collected and destroyed, and so thoroughly did Tonstall procure all that were to be had in Antwerp, that these editions are almost totally extinct.” (The English Hexapla, comp. by Samuel Bagster, 1841, 50)

[Bible / The Tyndale New Testament.]  The Newe Testament, dylygently corrected and compared with the Greke by Willyam Tindale: and fyneshed in the yere of oure Lorde God. [N.p.,] A. M. D. & xxxiiii [1534] in the moneth of November.

The revised (3rd) edn. of Tyndale’s New Testament, published November 1534, in response to George Joye’s corrupted reissue of Tyndale’s New Testament in English, printed in August 1534.
   It is this 3rd edn. of 1534, carefully corrected by Tyndale, that scholars use to assess Tyndale’s accuracy as translator.
   “This handsome small volume of 1534, well printed by de Keyser, is the English New Testament as it went forward into other sixteenth-century versions. 83 per cent of the King James (Authorized) Version New Testament is directly from Tyndale, in this 1534 revision.” (ODNB entry for William Tyndale by David Daniell, n. pag.)
   Thus, “Tyndale’s work was widely read and heard. It was, moreover, handed on into successive versions in that century, notably the three Geneva versions of 1560, 1576, and 1599. King James’s revisers, working between 1607 and 1611, though they made changes, went back to Tyndale afresh.” (ODNB entry for William Tyndale by David Daniell, n. pag.)
   As such, “Tyndale’s gift to the English language is unmeasurable. He translated into a register just above common speech, allied in its clarity to proverbs. It is a language which still speaks directly to the heart. His aims were always accuracy and clarity. King James’s revisers adopted his style, and his words, for much of the Authorized Version. At a time when European scholars and professionals communicated in Latin, Tyndale insisted on being understood by ordinary people. He preferred a simple Saxon syntax of subject–verb–object. His vocabulary is predominantly Saxon, and often monosyllabic. An Oxford scholar, he was always rhetorically alert. He gave the Bible-reading nation an English plain style. It is a basis for the great Elizabethan writers, and there is truth in the remark ‘without Tyndale, no Shakespeare’. It is not fanciful to see a chief agent of the energizing of the language in the sixteenth century in the constant reading of the Bible in English, of which Tyndale was the great maker.” (ODNB entry for William Tyndale by David Daniell, n. pag.)

[Bible / Joye’s Tyndale New Testament.]  Tyndale, William, trans., and George Joye. The new Testament as it was written, and caused to be written, by them which herde yt. Whom also oure Saveoure Christ Jesus commaunded that they shulde preach it unto al creatures. The Gospell of S. Mathew. The Gospell of S. Marke. The Gospell of S. Luke. The Gospell of S. Jhon. The Actes of the Apostles. Antwerpe: By me wyddowe of Christoffel of Endhoue[n], In the yere of oure Lorde. M.CCCCC. and. xxxiiii. in August [1534].

Revised edn. of Tyndale’s New Testament, with unauthorized changes by the evangelical author, George Joye (d. 1553).
   Printed at Antwerp in August 1534 by a woman, Catharine van Ruremund, the widow of Christoffel van Endhoven (alias Ruremund and Ruremond).
   “The Antwerp printing house of Van Endhoven had published, by 1534, four reissues of Tyndale’s 1526 Worms New Testament, in various small sizes, including sextodecimo. These printings say a good deal about the demand in Britain. In 1534 the widow of Christopher van Endhoven (who had died in London, imprisoned for printing and shipping English bibles) asked an English scholar living in Antwerp, George Joye, to oversee another edition, as the Flemish typesetters were not doing well. This he did. He also took the opportunity to make silent alterations to Tyndale’s work. In particular, he altered Tyndale’s English word ‘resurrection’, to make it ‘the life after this life’ and variations. Not to put his name to the changes was bad enough; but in 1533 the resurrection was the subject of debate among the English reformers.” (ODNB entry for William Tyndale by David Daniell, n. pag.)
   “Tyndale was already preparing his own revision of his 1526 New Testament, which was published in 1534 [i.e., the 3rd edn., rev. and corrected]. It shows his maturer thought, and skill, and in many ways improves on the 1526 version. He wrote for it a long prologue about translation, explaining among other things the importance of appreciating the Hebrew influence on New Testament Greek, something not widely understood before. He also wrote a second prologue, ‘W. T. yet once more unto the Christian reader’, in which he strongly attacked George Joye for his impertinence. Tyndale defends his own translation, and adds that Joye is free to come up with his own ideas, as long as he puts his own name to them.” (ODNB entry for William Tyndale by David Daniell, n. pag.)

Blackburne, Richard. Vitae Hobbianiae auctarium. In Thomae Hobbes Angli Malmesburiensis philosophi vita. Carolopoli: Apud Eleutherium Anglicum, sub Signo Veritatis, MDCLXXXI [1681]. 21–221.

Blount, Thomas. Glossographia: or a dictionary, interpreting all such hard words, whether Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Italian, Spanish, French, Teutonick, Belgick, British or Saxon; as are now used in our refined English tongue. Also the terms of divinity, law, physick, mathematicks, heraldry, anatomy, war, musick, architecture; and of several other arts and sciences explicated. With etymologies, definitions, and historical observations on the same. Very useful to all such as desire to understand what they read. By T. B. of the Inner-Temple, Barrester. London: Printed by Tho. Newcomb, and are to be sold by Humphrey Moseley, at the Prince’s Arms in St. Pauls Church-yard, and George Sawbridge at the Bible on Ludgate-hil, 1656.

Blundeville, Thomas. The true order and methode of wryting and reading hystories, according to the precepts of Francisco Patricio, and Accontio Tridentino, two Italian writers, no lesse plainly than briefly, set forth in our vulgar speach, to the great profite and commoditye of all those that delight in hystories. By Thomas Blundevill of Newton Flotman in Norfolke. Anno. 1574. Imprinted at London: By Willyam Seres, [1574].

Bocchi, Achille. Achillis Bocchii Bonon. Symbolicarvm quæstionum, De universo genere, quas serio ludebat, libri quinque. Bononiæ: Apud Societatem Typographiæ Bononiensis, 1574.

Botero, Giovanni. [The greatness of cities.] A treatise, concerning the causes of the magnificencie and greatnes of cities, devided into three bookes by Sig: Giovanni Botero, in the Italian tongue; now done into English by Robert Peterson, of Lincolnes Inne gent. Seene and allowed. At London: Printed by T. P. for Richard Ockould, and Henry Tomes, and are to be sold, at Grayes Inne gate in Holborne, An. Dom. 1606.

The 1st Eng. trans. (1606), by Robert Peterson (fl. 1576–1606), of Botero’s Delle Cause della Grandezza e Magnificenza della Città (1588, rpt. 1589).

Botero, Giovanni. [The reason of state.] Giovanni Botero[’s] The reason of state. Translated by P. J. and D. P. Waley. With an introduction by D. P. Waley. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1956.

Botero’s Italian-language original, Della Ragion di Stato Libri Dieci, was first printed at Venice in 1589 (revised 1598). It was an immediate best-seller, running to 10 editions in Italian, as well as 6 in Spanish, 4 in Latin, and 1 in French during Botero’s lifetime.

Boyle, Robert. The Christian virtuoso: shewing, that by being addicted to experimental philosophy, a man is rather assisted, than indisposed, to be a good Christian. The first part. By T. H. R. B., Fellow of the Royal Society. To which are subjoyn’d, I. A discourse about the distinction, that represents some things as above reason, but not contrary to reason. II. The first chapters of a discourse, entituled, Greatness of mind promoted by Christianity. By the same author. In the Savoy: Printed by Edw. Jones for John Taylor at the Ship, and John Wyat at the Golden-Lion, in St. Paul’s Church-yard, 1690.

Boyle, Robert. Experiments and considerations touching colours. First occasionally written, among some other essays, to a friend; and now suffer’d to come abroad as the beginning of an experimental history of colours. By the Honourable Robert Boyle, Fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed for Henry Herringman at the Anchor in the Lower walk of the New-Exchange, MDCLXIV [1664].

Boyle, Robert. Medicinal experiments; or, a collection of choice remedies, for the most part simple, and easily prepared. By the honorable R. Boyle, Esq; Fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed for Sam. Smith, at the Prince’s Arms in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, 1692.

Boyle, Robert. New experiments physico-mechanicall, touching the spring of the air, and its effect, (made, for the most part, in a new pneumatical engine) written by way of letter to the Right Honorable Charles, Lord Vicount of Dungarvan, eldest son to the Earl of Corke. By the Honorable Robert Boyle Esq. Oxford: Printed by H: Hall, printer to the University, for Tho: Robinson, 1660.

Boyle, Robert. Some considerations touching the usefulnesse of experimental naturall philosophy, propos’d in familiar discourses to a friend, by way of invitation to the study of it. Oxford: Printed by Hen: Hall printer to the University, for Ric: Davis, anno domini 1663.

Boyle, Robert. Some considerations touching the usefulnesse of experimental natural philosophy. Propos’d in a familiar discourse to a friend, by way of invitation to the study of it. By the Honourable Robert Boyle Esq; Fellow of the Royal Society. A second edition since the first published June 1663. Oxford: Printed by Hen: Hall printer to the University, for Ri: Davis, anno dom: 1664.

Boyle, Robert. Some considerations touching the usefulnesse of experimental naturall philosophy, propos’d in a familiar discourse to a friend by way of invitation to the study of it. The second tome, containing the later section of the second part. By the Honorable Robert Boyle Esq; Fellow of the Royal Society. Oxford: Printed by Henry Hall, printer to the University for Ric. Davis, 1671.

Boym, Michael de. Flora sinensis, fructus floresque humillime porrigens serenissiomo et potentissimo Leopoldo Ignatio, Hungariae regi florentissimo, &c. Fructus saeculo promittenti Augustissimos, emissa in publicum a R. P. Michaele Boym, Societatus Iesu sacerdores. Viennae, Austriae: Typis M. Rictij, MDCLVI [1656].

A digital edition of Boym’s Flora Sinensis is available online at the website of Harald Fischer Verlag (c.2003).

Bradstreet, Anne. The tenth muse lately sprung up in America. Or severall poems, compiled with great variety of wit and learning, full of delight. Wherein especially is contained a compleat discourse and description of {the four} elements, constitutions, ages of man, seasons of the year. Together with an exact epitome of the four monarchies, viz. at {the} Assyrian, Persian, Grecian, Roman. Also a dialogue between old England and new, concerning the late troubles. With divers other pleasant and serious poems. By a gentlewoman in those parts. Printed at London: For Stephen Botwell at the signe of the Bible Head-Alley, 1650.

Bray, William, ed. Diary and correspondence of John Evelyn. To which is subjoined the private correspondence between King Charles I and Sir Edward Nicholas, and between Sir Edward Hyde, afterwards Earl of Clarendon, and Sir Richard Browne. London, 1852. New edn., cor., rev., and enl. by John Forster. 4 vols. London: H. Colburn, 1854.

Brown, Thomas. Amusements serious and comical, calculated for the meridian of London. By Mr. Brown. London: Printed for John Nutt, near Stationers-Hall, 1700.

Brown, Thomas, et al. [Letters from the dead to the living, Part 1.] Letters from the dead to the living, by Mr. Tho. Brown, Capt. Ayloff, Mr. Hen. Barker, &c. Viz. from Jo. Haines of merry memory, to his friends at Wills. Perkin Warbeck, to the pretended Prince of Wales. Abraham Cowley, to the Covent-Garden Society. Charon, to the illustrious and high-born Jack Ketch. James the 2d, to Lewis the 14th. Julian late secretary to the muses, to Will. Peirre [sic] of Lincolns-Inn play-house. Scarron to Lewis le Grand. Hannibal to the victorious prince Eugene of Savoy. Pindar of Thebes, to Tom. D-----. Catharine of Medicis, to the dutchess of Orleans. Queen Mary to the pope. Harlequin, to Father le Chaise. The duke of Alva, to the clergy of France. Philip of Austria, to the dauphin. Juvenal, to Boileau. Diana of Poictiers, to Madam Maintenon. Hugh Spencer the younger, to all the favourites and ministers whom it may concern -----. Julia, to the princess of Conti. Christina queen of Sweden, to the women. Rabelais, to the physicians. The mitred hog; a dialogue between Furetiere and Scarron. Beau Norton, to his brothers at Hippollito’s. Sir Bartholomew -----, to Serjeant S-----. And several others with their answers. London: printed in the year, 1702.

Brown, Thomas, et al. [Letters from the dead to the living, Part 2.] A continuation or second part of the Letters from the dead to the living, by Mr. Tho. Brown, Capt. Ayloff, Mr. Henry Barker, &c. Viz. Mr. Jo. Haines’s second letter, to his friends at Will’s. Sir Fleet. Shepperd to Mr. P---r. Pominy of Avergne, to Mr. Abell the singer. Senior Nicola, to Mr. Buckley at the Swan Coffee-house. Alderm. Floyer, to Sir Humph. ----. Sir J. Norris, Q. Eliz. chief commander against the Spaniards, to Sir Henry and Sir Charles. The ghost of Chateauneuf, to the Arch Bp. of Cambray. The admiral of the invincible Armada to Monsieur Chateau Renault at Rodondello. Cornelius Gallus to the Lady Dilliana at the bath. Bully Dawson, to Bully Watson. Nell Gwyn, to Peg Hughs. Hugh Peters, to his brother Daniel in Russel Court. Ludlow, to the Calfe’s-head Club. James Nayler to his friends the Quakers at the Bull and Mouth. Lilly the fortune-teller, to Coley the almanack-maker, Baldwin’s Garden. Tony Lee, to Cave Underhill. Harry Purcel, to Dr. Blow. Mrs. Behn, to the famous virgin actress. Madam Creswell, to her sister in iniquity Moll Quarles. And several others with their answers. London: printed in the year, 1703.

Browne, Thomas, Sir. “Of the Cameleon.” In Pseudodoxia epidemica: or, Enquiries into very many received tenents, and commonly presumed truths. By Thomas Browne Dr. of physick. London: Printed by Tho. Harper for Edward Dod, 1646. 3. 157–163.

An HTML transcription of Sir Thomas Browne’s essay on the chameleon is available in the She-philosopher.​com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. BRNE1646a.

Browne, Thomas, Sir. The prose of Sir Thomas Browne: Religio medici, Hydriotaphia, The garden of Cyrus, A letter to a friend, Christian morals, with selections from Pseudodoxia epidemica, Miscellany tracts, and from ms. notebooks and letters. Ed. and introd. by Norman J. Endicott. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1972.

Bry, Theodor de. Thomas Hariot’s Virginia, by Theodore de Bry. Frankfurt, 1590. Facs. rpt. New York: Readex Microprint, 1966.

See also separate entry for Hariot.

Bullord, John. A catalogue of books of two eminent mathematicians: consisting of a curious collection of history, divinity, philosophy; but chiefly the mathematicks. In Latin, English and French in all volumes. Which will be exposed to sale by way of auction, on Thursday next being the 21st of this instant May, 1691. at Roll’s Coffee-House on the north-side of St. Paul’s Church-Yard. By John Bullord. [London:] Catalogues whereof are distributed gratis at Mr. Richard Parker’s under the Piazza of the Royal Exchange; Mr. Bullord in St. Paul’s Church Yard; Mr. Goodwin against St. Dunstans-Church in Fleet-Street; Mr. Partridge at the Post Office at Charing-Cross; Mrs. Feltham in Westminster-Hall, and at Roll’s Coffee-House, [1691].

Bullord, John. A curious collection of books, in divinity, history, and philology; in Greek, Latin, Italian, French, and English, in all volumes. Will be sold by auction, on Tuesday June 11th, 1695. and the following days, at three in the afternoon, at Tom’s coffee house adjoyning to Ludgate. By John Bullord. Conditions of sale. 1. The highest bidder is the buyer, &c. 2 The books for ought we know are perfect; if any apopear otherwise before they be taken away, the buyer has his choice of taking or leaving them. 3. That every person give in his name and place of abode, paying also 5 s. in the pound for what he shall buy, and be obliged to take them away, and pay the remaining part of the money at the place of sale, within 3 days after it be ended; the buyer also paying porteridge. 4. None to bid less than 6 d. a time, when a book arises above 10 s. Catalogues may be had at Mr. Notts in the Pall-mall; Mr. Ropers at the Black Boy in Fleetstreet; Mr. Richard Parkers on the Piazza under the Royal Exchange, booksellers, and at the place of sale. [London: s.n., 1695].

Bullord, John. The library of Mr. Tho. Britton, smallcoal-man. Being a curious collection of books in divinity, history, physick and chimistry, in all volumes. Also an extraordinary collection of manuscripts in Latin and English, will be sold by auction at Toms Coffee-House, adjoyning to Ludgate, on Thursday the 1st of November, at three in the afternoon. By John Bullord. Catalogues are distributed gratis by Mr. Nott in the Pall-mall; Mr. Hargrave at the Kings-Head in Holbourn; Mr. Cooper at the Palican [sic] in Little Britain; Mr. Parker on the Piazza of the Royal Exchange, and at the place of sale. [London: s.n., 1694].

Bulwer, John. Chirologia: or the naturall language of the hand. Composed of the speaking motions, and discoursing gestures thereof. Whereunto is added Chironomia: or, the art of manuall rhetoricke. Consisting of the naturall expressions, digested by art in the hand, as the chiefest instrument of eloquence, by historicall manifesto’s, exemplified out of the authentique registers of common life, and civill conversation. With types, or chyrograms: a long-wish’d for illustration of this argument. By J. B. Gent. Philochirosophus. 2 vols. London: Printed by Tho. Harper, and are to be sold by Henry Twyford, at his shop in Fleetstreet, 1644.

Buonanni, Filippo. Musaeum Kircherianum. Rome: Typis Georgii Plachi, 1709.

Burton, Robert. The anatomy of melancholy. What it is, with all the kinds, causes, symptomes, prognostickes & severall cures of it. Oxford, 1621. Ed. and introd. by Holbrook Jackson. New York: Vintage Books, 1977.

An HTML transcription of excerpts from Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy is available in the She-philosopher.​com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. BURT1621.

Butler, Samuel. “The elephant in the moon.” In Satires and miscellaneous poetry and prose. Ed. by René Lamar. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1923.

Capella, Martianus. The marriage of Philology and Mercury. Trans. William Harris Stahl and Richard Johnson, with E. L. Burge. Vol. 2 of Martianus Capella and the seven liberal arts. 2 vols. Records of civilization, sources and studies, no. 84. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977.

Carter, Elizabeth, trans. Sir Isaac Newton’s philosophy explain’d for the use of the ladies .... By Francesco Algarotti. London, 1739. Rpt. London, 1742; Glasgow, 1765.

Casaubon, Meric. A letter of Meric Casaubon D.D. &c. to Peter du Moulin D.D. and prebenderie of the same church: concerning natural experimental philosophie, and some books lately set out about it. Cambridge: Printed for William Morden bookseller, 1669.

Caulfield, James. Portraits, memoirs, and characters, of remarkable persons, from the revolution in 1688 to the end of the reign of George II. Collected from the most authentic accounts extant. By James Caulfield. In four volumes. 4 vols. London: H. R. Young and T. H. Whitely, 1819–20.

Cavendish, Margaret. CCXI. Sociable letters, written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess, the lady marchioness of Newcastle. London: Printed by William Wilson, Anno. Dom. M.DC.LXIV [1664].

An HTML transcription of selections from Margaret Cavendish’s Sociable Letters is available in the She-philosopher.​com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. MC1664a.

Cavendish, Margaret. The description of a new world, called the blazing world. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princesse, the duchess of Newcastle. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, 1666.

Cavendish, Margaret. The description of a new world, called the blazing-world. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princesse, the duchess of Newcastle. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, 1668.

Cavendish, Margaret. Grounds of natural philosophy: divided into thirteen parts, with an appendix containing five parts. The second edition, much altered from the first, which went under the name of Philosophical and physical opinions. London: A. Maxwell, 1668.

Cavendish, Margaret. The life of the thrice noble, high and puissant prince William Cavendishe, duke, marquess, and earl of Newcastle, earl of Ogle; viscount Mansfield; and baron of Bolsover, of Ogle, Bothal and Hepple: gentleman of his majesties bed-chamber; one of his majesties most honourable privy-councel; knight of the most noble Order of the Garter; his majesties lieutenant of the county and town of Nottingham; and justice in Ayre Trent-North: who had the honour to be governour to our most glorious king, and gracious sovereign, in his youth, when he was prince of Wales; and soon after was made captain general of all the provinces beyond the river of Trent, and other parts of the kingdom of England, with power, by a special commission, to make knights. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious and excellent princess, Margaret, duchess of Newcastle, his wife. London, Printed by A. Maxwell, in the Year 1667.

Cavendish, Margaret. Natures pictures drawn by fancies pencil to the life. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess, the lady marchioness of Newcastle. In this volume there are several feigned stories of natural descriptions, as comical, tragical, and tragi-comical, poetical, romancical, philosophical, and historical, both in prose and verse, some all verse, some all prose, some mixt, partly prose, and partly verse. Also, there are some morals, and some dialogues; but they are as the advantage loaves of bread to a bakers dozen; and a true story at the latter end, wherein there is no feignings. London: Printed for J. Martin, and J. Allestrye, at the Bell in Saint Paul’s Church-yard, 1656.

Cavendish, Margaret. Natures picture drawn by fancies pencil to the life. Being several feigned stories, comical, tragical, tragi-comical, poetical, romancical, philosophical, historical, and moral: some in verse, some in prose; some mixt, and some by dialogues. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and most excellent princess, the duchess of Newcastle. The second edition. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, in the year 1671.

Cavendish, Margaret. Observations upon experimental philosophy. To which is added the description of a new blazing world. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princesse, the duchesse of Newcastle. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, in the year, 1666.

Cavendish, Margaret. Observations upon experimental philosophy: to which is added the description of a new blazing world. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princesse, the duchess of Newcastle. The second edition. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, in the year M.DC.LX.VIII [1668].

Cavendish, Margaret. Orations of divers sorts, accommodated to divers places. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious and excellent princess, the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: Printed Anno Dom. 1662.

Cavendish, Margaret. Orations of divers sorts, accommodated to divers places. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious and excellent princess, the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: Printed Anno Dom. 1663.

Cavendish, Margaret. Orations of divers sorts, accommodated to divers places. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess, the Duchess of Newcastle. The second edition. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, in the year 1668.

Cavendish, Margaret. The philosophical and physical opinions. Written by her excellency, the lady marchionesse of Newcastle. London: Printed for J. Martin and J. Allestrye at the Bell in St. Pauls Church-Yard, 1655.

Cavendish, Margaret. Philosophical letters: or, modest reflections upon some opinions in natural philosophy, maintained by several famous and learned authors of this age, expressed by way of letters: by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess, the Lady Marchioness of Newcastle. London: [n.p.], printed in the year, 1664.

An HTML transcription of selections from Margaret Cavendish’s Philosophical Letters is available in the She-philosopher.​com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. MC1664b.

Cavendish, Margaret. Philosophicall fancies. Written by the right honourable, the lady Newcastle. London: Printed by Tho. Roycroft, for J. Martin and J. Allestrye, at the Bell in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1653.

Cavendish, Margaret. Playes written by the thrice noble, illustrious and excellent princess, the lady marchioness of Newcastle. London: Printed by A. Warren, for John Martyn, James Allestry, and Tho. Dicas, at the Bell in Saint Pauls Church Yard, 1662.

Cavendish, Margaret. Plays, never before printed. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princesse, the duchess of Newcastle. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, 1668.

Cavendish, Margaret. Poems, and fancies: written by the right honourable, the lady Margaret countesse of Newcastle. London: Printed by T. R. for J. Martin, and J. Allestrye at the Bell in Saint Pauls Church Yard, 1653.

This is typically cited as the 1st printing of Margaret Cavendish’s Poems, and her 1st published work; however, H. T. E. Perry noted that some copies of the Poems appeared in 1652, as described in Hist. MSS. Comm. (10 Rep., App. iv, p. 47) wherein, under the date of 1652, is a remark “Upon ye La Margaret Marchioness of Newcastle her rare poems new come forth.”

Cavendish, Margaret. Poems, and phancies, written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess the lady marchioness of Newcastle. The second impression, much altered and corrected. London: Printed by William Wilson, Anno Dom. M.DC.LXIV [1664].

Cavendish, Margaret. Poems, or, several fancies in verse: with the animal parliament, in prose. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and excellent princess, the duchess of Newcastle. The third edition. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, in the year M.DC.LX.VIII [1668].

Cavendish, Margaret. The worlds olio. Written by the right honorable, the Lady Margaret Newcastle. London: Printed for J. Martin and J. Allestrye at the Bell in St. Pauls Church-Yard, 1655.

Cavendish, Margaret. The worlds olio. Written by the thrice noble, illustrious, and most excellent princess, the duchess of Newcastle. The second edition. London: Printed by A. Maxwell, in the year 1671.

Cavendish, William. Letter of instructions to Prince Charles for his studies, conduct, and behaviour. MS., written c.1638. From a copy preserved with the Royal Letters in the Harleian MS., 6988, Art. 62. Printed by Sir Henry Ellis, Original Letters, Illustrative of English History, First Series, 3 vols., 1824, 3.288–291.

An HTML transcription of Newcastle’s letter to the prince is available in the She-philosopher.​com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. WC1638.

Cavendish, William. Letter to Charles II. MS., written c.1650s. From a copy preserved in the Portland archives, in the library at Welbeck, Case III, C2. Printed by S. Arthur Strong, A Catalogue of Letters and Other Historical Documents Exhibited in the Library at Welbeck, 1903, 173–236.

An HTML transcription of Newcastle’s speculum principis (described by his wife as “a little Book, or rather a Letter”), presented to Charles II before his restoration in 1660, is available in the She-philosopher.​com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. WC1650s.

Cavendish, William. Letter to Charles II. Transcribed and introduced by Thomas P. Slaughter. In Ideology and politics on the eve of Restoration: Newcastle’s Advice to Charles II. Memoirs series, vol. 159. Philadelphia: The American Philosophical Society, 1984.

Cavendish, William. La méthode nouvelle et invention extraordinaire de dresser les chevaux les travailler selon la nature et parfaire la nature par la subtilté de l’art; la quelle n’a jamais été treuvée que par le tres-noble haut et tres-puissant prince Guillaume, marquis et comte de Newcastle, viconte de Mansfield, baron de Bolsover et Ogle, seigneur de Cavendish, Bothal et Hepwel etc. etc. Traduit de l’Anglois de l’auteur en Francois par son commandement. A Anvers: Chez Jacques van Meurs l’an MDCLVIII [1658].

This is typically cited as the 1st printing of the Antwerp edn. of Newcastle’s first published book on horsemanship, La Methode Nouvelle. The printing house of Jacques van Meurs produced a magnificent folio, with engraved title-page and additional 42 fine plates executed by multiple engravers.
   David Steadman notes that the Biblioteque Royale, Brussels, holds an even earlier folio copy of Newcastle’s fully illustrated manual of dressage, printed at Antwerp in 1657, with copper-plate engravings by Lucas Vosterman (aka Vorstermans), after the same designs by Abraham van Diepenbeeck.

Cavendish, William. Methode et invention nouvelle de dresser les chevaux par le tres-noble, haut, et tres-puissant prince Guillaume marquis et comte de Newcastle vicomte de Mansfield, baron de Bolsover et Ogle; seigneur de Cavendish, Bothal et Hepwel; pair d’Angleterre; qui eut la charge & l’honneur d’estre gouverneur du serenissime prince de Galles en sa jeunesse, maintenant roy de la Grande-Bretagne; lieutenant pour le roy de la comté de Nottingham, & de la Forest de Sherwood; Capitaine General en toutes les provinces outre la riviere de Trent, & autres endroits du royaume d’Angleterre; gentilhomme de la chambre du lit du roy; conseiller d’Etat & privé; chevalier du tres-noble Ordre de la Jarretiere, &c. Oeuvre auquel on apprend à travailler les chevaux selon la nature, & à parfaire la nature par la subtilité de l’art: traduit de l’Anglois de l’Auteur, par son commandement; & enrichy de plus de quarante belles figures en taille douce. Seconde édition. A Londres: chez Jean Brindley, Libraire de S. A. R. Monseigneur le Prince de Galles, dans New Bond-street, MDCCXXXVII [1737].

The 2nd edn. of Newcastle’s La Méthode nouvelle et Invention extraordinaire de Dresser des Chevaux (originally printed at Antwerp in 1657/8), including the 43 double-page plates engraved by Lucas Vosterman and Cornelis van Caukercken after designs by Abraham van Diepenbeeck. The original manuscript and plates are preserved at Welbeck and were provided to the London printer, John Brindley, by Newcastle’s great-granddaughter, Henrietta (Cavendish-Holles) Harley, the countess of Oxford (1694–1755).
   Brindley’s superb reissue of the original French text in 1737 was profitable enough that he printed an English translation 6 years later, as vol. 1 of the newly-titled A General System of Horsemanship (1743).

Cavendish, William. The manner of feeding, dressing and training of horses for the great saddle.... In A general system of horsemanship in all it’s [sic] branches: containing a faithful translation of that most noble and useful work of his grace, William Cavendish, duke of Newcastle, entitled The manner of feeding, dressing and training of horses for the great saddle, and fitting them for the service of the field in time of war, or for the exercise and improvement of gentlemen in the academy at home: a science peculiarly necessary throughout all Europe and which has hitherto been so much neglected or discouraged in England, that young gentlemen have been obliged to have recourse to foreign nations for this part of their education. With all the original copper-plates, in number forty-three which were engrav’d by the best foreign masters under his grace’s immediate care and inspection, and which are explained in the different lessons. And to give all the improvements that may be, this work is ornamented with the head-pieces and initial letters, properly adapted to the subsequent chapters and enlarged with an index. Vol. I. London: Printed for J. Brindley Bookseller to his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales in New Bond Street MDCCXLIII [1743].

This 18th-century reissue was the 1st English edn. of Newcastle’s La Méthode nouvelle et Invention extraordinaire de Dresser des Chevaux to be fully illustrated.
   Vol. 2 of A General System of Horsemanship combined 4 additional treatises on horses and racehorses (including The Osteology and Myology of a Horse: or, an Anatomical Description of all the Bones and Muscles ... with “near thirty Copper-plates, in which the Seats of all Diseases are not only exactly described, but with several new Instruments requisite in the Cure of them most accurately described”) with a “large Collection of Recipes, communicated by several Persons of Experience and Distinction,” an index of diseases, an index of medicines, and a dictionary “explaining all the Technical Terms that belong to the Stud, the Stable, the Manage, Farriery, or whatever relates to Horses.”

Cavendish, William. A new method and extraordinary invention to dress horses, and work them, according to nature; as also, to perfect nature by the subtilty of art; which was never found out, but by the thrice noble, high, and puissant prince William Cavendishe. Duke, marquess, and earl of Newcastle; earl of Ogle; viscount Mansfield; and baron of Bolsover, of Ogle, of Bertram, Botham, and Hepple: gentleman of his majesties bed-chamber; one of his majesties most honourable privy-councel; knight of the most noble Order of the Garter; his majesties lieutenant of the county and town of Nottingham; and justice in Ayre Trent-North: who had the honour to be governour to our most glorious king, and gracious soveraign, in his youth, when he was prince of Wales; and soon after was made captain general of all the provinces beyond the river of Trent, and other parts of the kingdom of England; with power, by a special commission, to make knights. London: Printed by Tho. Milbourn in the year 1667.

This was the first English printing of Newcastle’s La Methode Nouvelle, although it is not a translation of the original French work first published at Antwerp in 1657/8. In the dedication to Charles II, the duke refers to this as his “Second” book of horsemanship, and repeats this classification in his epistle “To the Readers”: “... having again, since my Return to my Native Country, had much leisure, in my solitary Country Life, to recollect my Thoughts, and try new Experiments about that Art; I now, for the more particular Satisfaction of my Country-men, Print this second Book, in English; which being neither a Translation of the first, nor an absolutely necessary Addition to it, may be of use by it self, without the other, as the other hath been hitherto, and is still, without this; but both together will questionless do best” (b1rv).
   None of the 17th-century edns. of Newcastle’s manual of dressage published at London (this rev. Eng. edn. and a Fr. trans. of it in 1667, a 2nd impression of the Fr. trans. in 1671, and a 2nd impression of the original Eng. in 1677) were illustrated.

Cavendish, William. Methode nouvelle, et invention extraordinaire de dresser les chevaux, et les travailler selon la nature, qui est perfectionée par la subtilité d’un art, qui n’a jamais esté trouvé, que par le tres-noble, haut, & tres-puissant prince, Guillaume de Cavendysh, duc, marquis, & comte de Newcastle; comte d’Ogle; visconte de Mansfield; & baron de Bolsover, d’Ogle, de Bertram, de Bothal, & d’Hepwel: gentilhomme de la chambre du lict du roy de la Grande Bretagne, & conseillier en ses conseils d’estat & privé: chevalier du tres — noble, Ordre de la Jartiere: gouverneur pour le roy de la province & ville de Nottingham: grand maistre des forets du nord au dela la riviere de Trent: et a eu l’honneur d’estre gouverneur du roy d’apresent en sa jeunesse, lors qu’il estoit prince de Galles, & d’estre, bien tost apres, general des armées du seu roy dans les provinces septentrionales, & autres circunvoisines, du royaume d’Angleterre; avec une ample commission, & pouvoir special de faire des chevaliers. Traduite mot à mot en François, sur l’original anglois. A Londres: Chez Tho. Milbourn, MDCLXXI [1671].

This is considered “a rather unsatisfactory French translation” of Newcastle’s “second book” of horsemanship, first published in English by Milbourn as A New Method and Extraordinary Invention to Dress Horses, and Work Them, According to Nature in 1667.
   Nonetheless, Milbourne’s 1671 French edn. was reissued in 1674, and afterwards revised by Jacques de Solleysel, whose corrected French edn. was published at Paris in 1677.
   “The Duke had his second text also turned into French and published both versions in the same year at London. A French copy fell into the hands of Monsieur de Solleysel, whose own knowledge of horsemanship enabled him to detect the faults in translation and who wrote to Newcastle asking permission to undertake a more perfect rendering. This the Englishman granted, and afterwards, with his grandson as intermediary, he approved certain notes and explanations added by de Solleysel. A German translation by Johann Philipp Ferdinand Pernauer followed in 1700. It was printed at Nuremberg with the French in a parallel column and was adorned by essentially Teutonic attempts to reproduce the plates of Newcastle’s earlier work. Thus it may be seen that the Marquis’s two books had a decided vogue and at once became the authorities on manage, which they have ever since remained.” (H. T. E. Perry, The First Duchess of Newcastle and Her Husband as Figures in Literary History, 139–40)

Cellier, Elizabeth. To Dr. ----- An answer to his queries, concerning the college of midwives. London, 1688. Rpt. in English women’s voices, 1540–1700. Ed. by Charlotte Otten. Miami: Florida International U P, 1992. 206–211.

Chambers, Ephraim. Cyclopædia, or, an universal dictionary of arts and sciences. Containing the definitions of the terms, and accounts of the things signify’d thereby, in the several arts, both liberal and mechanical, and the several sciences, human and divine: the figures, kinds, properties, productions, preparations, and uses, of things natural and artificial: the rise, progress, and state of things ecclesiastical, civil, military, and commercial: with the several systems, sects, opinions, &c. among philosophers, divines, mathematicians, physicians, antiquaries, criticks, &c: the whole intended as a course of antient and modern learning. Compiled from the best authors, dictionaries, journals, memoirs, transactions, ephemerides, &c. in several languages, by E. Chambers. 2 vols. London: Printed for James and John Knapton, John Darby, Daniel Midwinter, Arthur Bettesworth, John Senex, Robert Gossing, John Pemberton, William and John Innys, John Osborne and Tho. Longman, Charles Rivington, John Hooke, Ranew Robinson, Francis Clay, Aaron Ward, Edward Synon, Daniel Browne, Andrew Johnston, and Thomas Osborn, MDCCXXVIII [1728].

A complete digital edition of Chambers’ 2-volume Cyclopaedia is available online, as part of the History of Science project, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections Center.

Chambers, Ephraim, rev. by Abraham Rees. Cyclopaedia: or, an universal dictionary of arts and sciences. Containing an explanation of the terms, and an account of the several subjects, in the liberal and mechanical arts, and the sciences, human and divine. Intended as a course of ancient and modern learning. By E. Chambers, F.R.S. With the supplement, and modern improvements, incorporated in one alphabet. By Abraham Rees, D.D. In four volumes. 5 vols. London: Printed for W. Strahan [and 28 others], 1783–1786.

Chambers, Ephraim. Selections from Cyclopædia, or, an universal dictionary of arts and sciences. Accessed 21 August 2005, from < http://​www.​cyclopaedia.​org/ >.

This is Lawrence Miller’s website, dedicated to Chambers’ Cyclopaedia, with high-resolution facsimile reproductions of the frontispiece and plates from different Cyclopædia editions, plus thorough coverage of related subjects (such as a very good collection of material on John Senex, one of Chambers’ publishers).

Chapman, George, Ben Jonson, and John Marston. Eastward hoe. As it was playd in the Black-friers. By the children of her Maiesties reuels. Made by Geo: Chapman. Ben: Ionson. Ioh: Marston. At London: Printed for William Aspley, 1605.

Charleton, Walter, trans. De vita et rebus gestis nobilissimi illustrissimique principis Guilielmi ducis novo-castrensis, commentarii. Ab excellentissima principe, Margareta ipsius uxore sanctissima conscripti. Et ex anglico in latinum conversi. By Margaret Cavendish. Londini: Excudebat T. M., 1668.

Charleton, Walter. The Ephesian and Cimmerian matrons. Two notable examples of the power of love & wit. In the Savoy: Printed for Henry Herringman at the sign of the Anchor in the lower-walk of the New-Exchange, 1668.

Charleton, Walter, trans. Epicurus’s morals, collected partly out of his owne Greek text, in Diogenes Laertius, and partly out of the rhapsodies of Marcus Antoninus, Plutarch, Cicero, & Seneca. And faithfully Englished. London: Printed by W. Wilson, for Henry Herringman, and are to be sold at his shop, at the Anchor in the lower walke in the New Exchange, 1656.

Charleton, Walter. The immortality of the human soul, demonstrated by the light of nature. In two dialogues. London: Printed by William Wilson for Henry Herringman, and are to be sold at his shop, at the signe of the Anchor in the Lower-walke, in the New-Exchange, 1657.

Christine, de Pizan. Here begynneth the booke whiche is called the body of polycye. And it speketh of vertues and of good maners, and the sayd boke is devyded in thre partyes. The fyrst party is adressed to prynces. The seconde to knyghtes and nobles: and the thyrde to the unyversal people. The fyrst chapytre speketh of the dyscrypcyon of the body of polycye. Imprynted at London: Without Newe gate in saynt Pulkers parysshe by John Skot, in the yere of our lorde. M.CCCCC.xxi. The xiii. yere of the reygne of kynge Henry the. viii. The. xvii daye of Maye [1521].

Clayton, John. “Account of several observables in Virginia.” A series of 5 letters, printed 1693–4. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London, vol. 17, no. 201 (June 1693): 781–9 and 790–5; vol. 17, no. 205 (Nov. 1693): 941–8; vol. 17, no. 206 (Dec. 1693): 978–98; and vol. 18, no. 210 (May 1694): 121–35.

[Clayton, John.] Ms., “An account of the Indians in Virginia and of some remarkable things in that country. Collected out of some letters from a minister in Virginia. Some few things are inserted concerning the English there, & the bucaniers in some places of America. An dom 1689.” Transcribed and printed in “An account of the Indians in Virginia.” By Stanley Pargellis. The William and Mary quarterly, 3rd Ser. 16.2 (Apr. 1959): 230–43.

Clayton, John. “A letter from the revd Mr. John Clayton, (afterwards dean of Kildare in Ireland) to Dr. Grew, in answer to several queries relating to Virginia, sent to him by that learned gentleman, A. D. 1687. Communicated by the right reverend father in god Robert lord bishop of Corke, to John earl of Egmont, F.R.S.” Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London 41.454 (July–Oct. 1739): 143–62.

Clayton, John. Ms., “A letter from the revd Mr John Clayton afterwards dean of Kildare in Ireland to Dr Grew, in answer to several quaerys sent to him by that learned gentleman. A.D. 1687.” Transcribed and printed with notes in “John Clayton’s 1687 account of the medicinal practices of the Virginia Indians.” By Bernard G. Hoffman. Ethnohistory 11.1 (Winter 1964): 3–20.

Coetlogon, Dennis de. An universal history of arts and sciences: or, A comprehensive illustration, definition, and description of all sciences, divine and human; and of all arts, liberal and mechanical. The origins and progresses of all religions, sects, heresies and schisms. The description of all countries; their government, ecclesiastical, civil and military; their different climates, soils, products, and the manners of the inhabitants. The different systems of philosophers, curious and accurate observations of astronomers, both antient and modern. The history of all orders, religious and military. With curious and entirely new treatises on the duties of embassadors and plenipotentiaries, the education of princes and their subjects, and the manner of travelling into foreign parts. The whole extracted from the best authors in all languages, and enriched with the new systems, hypotheses, maxims, and reflections of the author. By the Chevalier Dennis de Coetlogon, Knt. of Saint Lazare, M. D. and member of the Royal Academy of Angers. 2 vols. London: Printed and sold by John Hart, in Popping’s-Court, Fleet-street, MDCCXLV [1745; i.e., 1740–1747].

Collins, Arthur. Historical collections of the noble families of Cavendishe, Holles, Vere, Harley, and Ogle: with the lives of the most remarkable persons, particularly of William Cavendishe, Duke of Newcastle. Henry Cavendishe, Duke of Newcastle.... Containing curious private memoirs ... and prints of the principal persons engraved by Mr. George Vertue, from original pictures, drawn by the most eminent painters. Collected from records, manuscripts, our most authentick historians, and other undoubted authorities. London: Printed for Edward Withers ..., MDCCLII [1752].

Combe, Thomas, trans. The theater of fine devices, containing an hundred morall emblemes. First penned in French by Guillaume de la Perriere, and translated into English by Thomas Combe. London: Printed by Richard Field, 1614.

Comenius, Johann Amos. Orbis sensualium pictus. Faksimiledruck der Ausgabe Noribergae, M. Endtner, 1658, mit Nachwort von Hellmut Rosenfeld unter Beifügung eines vollständigen Faksimiledrucks des Lucidarium-Probedrucks von 1657. Facs. rpt. Osnabrück: O. Zeller, 1964.

Comenius, Johann Amos, and Charles Hoole, trans. Joh. Amos Commenii Orbis sensualium pictus. Hoc est, omnium fundamentalium in mundo rerum, & in vita actionum, pictura & nomenclatura. Joh. Amos Commenius’s Visible world, or, a picture and nomenclature of all the chief things that are in the world, and of mens employments therein. A work newly written by the author in Latine, and High-Dutch (being one of his last essays, and the most suitable to childrens capacities of any that he hath hitherto made) & translated into English, by Charles Hoole, teacher of a private grammar-school in Lothbury, London. For the use of young Latine-scholars. London: Printed for J. Kirton, at the Kings-Arms, in Saint Paules Church-yard, 1659.

Comenius, Johann Amos. The Orbis pictus of John Amos Comenius. Ed. by C. W. Bardeen. Syracuse, NY: C. W. Bardeen, 1887.

Cooper, Thomas. Thesaurus linguae Romanae & Britannicae, tam accurate congestus, ut nihil penè in eo desyderari possit, quod vel Latinè complectatur amplissimus Stephani Thesaurus, vel Anglicè, toties aucta Eliotae Bibliotheca: opera & industria Thomae Cooperi Magdalenensis. Quid fructus ex hoc thesauro studiosi possint excerpere, & quam rationem secutus author sit in vocabulorum interpretatione & dispositione, post epistolam demonstratur. Accessit dictionarium historicum et poëticum propria vocabula virorum, mulierum, sectarum, populorum, urbium, montium, & caeterorum locorum complectens, & in his jucundissimas & omnium cognitione dignissimas historias. Excusum Londini: In aedibus quondam Bertheleti, cum privilegio Regiae Majestatis, per Henricum Wykes, Anno domini. 1565. 16. Martii.

Cowley, Abraham. Abrahami Couleii Angli, poemata latina. In quibus continentur, sex libri plantarum, viz. duo herbarum, duo florum, duo sylvarum. Et unus miscellaneorum .... Ed. and introd. by Thomas Sprat. Londini: Typis T. Roycroft, impensis Jo. Martyn, 1668.

Cowley, Abraham. “To the Royal Society.” In The history of the Royal-Society of London, for the improving of natural knowledge. By Thomas Sprat. London: Printed by T. R. for J. Martyn at the Bell without Temple-bar, and J. Allestry at the Rose and Crown in Duck-lane, Printers to the Royal Society. MDCLXVII [1667]. B1r–B3v.

An HTML transcription of Cowley’s ode is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. COWL1667.

Croll, Oswald. Basilica Chymica, continens philosophicam propria laborum experientia confirmatam descriptionem & usum remediorum chymicorum selectissimorum è lumine gratiae et naturae desumptorum. In fine libri additus est eiusdem Autoris Tractatus novus de Signaturis Rerum Internis. Frankfort, 1609.

Cuningham, William. The cosmographical glasse, conteinyng the pleasant principles of cosmographie, geographie, hydrographie, or nauigation. Compiled by William Cunningham doctor in physicke. London: Excussum Londini in officina Ioan. Day Typographi, 1559.

Defoe, Daniel. An essay upon projects. London: Printed by R. R. for Tho. Cockerill, at the corner of Warwick-Lane, near Pater-noster-Row, MDCXCVII [1697].

Dekker, Thomas. The seven deadly sinnes of London: drawne in seven severall coaches, through the seven severall gates of the citie bringing the plague with them. Opus septem dierum. Tho: Dekker. At London: Printed by E. A. for Nathaniel Butter, and are to bee solde at his shop neere Saint Austens gate, 1606.

Derham, William. Astro-theology: or a demonstration of the being and attributes of God, from a survey of the heavens. Illustrated with copper-plates. By W. Derham, rector of Upminster in Essex, and F.R.S. London: Printed for W. Innys, at the Prince’s Arm in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, MDCCXV [1715].

Derham, William. Physico-theology, or, A demonstration of the being and attributes of God, from his works of creation. Being the substance of sixteen sermons preached in St. Mary-le-Bow-Church, London; at the honourable Mr. Boyle’s lectures, in the years 1711, and 1712. With large notes, and many curious observations. By W. Derham, canon of Windsor, rector of Upminster in Essex, and F.R.S. The fifth edition, more correct than any of the former. London: Printed for W. and J. Innys, at the Prince’s-Arms the west end of St. Paul’s, 1720.

As noted in the title, this printing of 1720 was the 5th edn., and “more correct than any of the former.” The editio princeps of Physico-Theology, or, A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God from his Works of Creation appeared in 1713.

Dorrington, Theophilus. The excellent woman described by her true characters and their opposites. London: Printed for Joseph Watts ..., 1692.

Dryden, John. Mac Flecknoe. London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, 1692.

Dryden’s Mac Flecknoe was actually written much earlier, and circulated in manuscript in 1676.

Dunton, John. The life and errors of John Dunton late citizen of London; written by himself in solitude. With an idea of a new life; wherein is shewn how he’d think, speak, and act, might he live over his days again: intermix’d with the new discoveries the author has made in his travels abroad, and in his private conversation at home. Together with the lives and characters of a thousand persons now living in London, &c. Digested into seven stages, with their respective ideas. He that has all his own mistakes confest, stands next to him that never has transgrest, and will be censur’d for a fool by none, but they who see no errors of their own. Foe’s Satyr upon himself, P.6. London: Printed for S. Malthus, 1705.

Du Verger, Susan. Admirable Events: Selected out of Foure Bookes, Written in French by the Right Reverend, John Peter Camus, Bishop of Belley. Together with Morall Relations, Written by the Same Author. And Translated into English by S. Du Verger. London: Printed by Thomas Harper for William Brooks, and are to be sold at his shop in Holborn in Turnstile Lane, 1639.

Du Verger, Susan. Du Vergers humble reflections upon some passages of the Right Honorable the Lady Marchionesse of Newcastles Olio. Or an appeale from her mes-informed, to her owne better informed judgement. London: [n.p.], M.DC.LVII [1657].

Elderton, William. A newe ballade, declaryng the daungerons [sic] shootynge of the gunne at the courte. To the tune of Sicke and sicke. [London]: Imprinted at London for Edward White, dwellyng at the little north-doore of Sainct Paules churche, at the signe of the Gunne, [1579].

A digital edition of this ballad, and its sources, reporting on the random gunshot that almost brought down Elizabeth I in 1579 is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. BALLAD1579.

Ellis, Henry, Sir. Original letters, illustrative of English history; including numerous royal letters: from autographs in the British Museum, and one or two other collections. With notes and illustrations by Henry Ellis, F.R.S. Sec. S.A. Keeper of the manuscripts in the British Museum. In three volumes. 1st series, 3 vols. London: printed for Harding, Triphook, and Lepard, MDCCCXXIV [1824].

The English hexapla. Exhibiting the six important English translations of the New Testament Scriptures, Wiclif, M.CCC.LXXX., Tyndale, M.D.XXXIV., Cranmer, M.D.XXXIX., Genevan, M.D.LVII., Anglo-Rhemish, M.D.LXXXII., Authorised, M.DC.XI. The original Greek text after Scholz. With the various readings of the textus receptus and the principal Constantinopolitan and Alexandrine manuscripts, and a complete collation of Scholz’s text with Griesbach’s edition of M.DCCC.V.; preceded by an historical account of the English translations. London: Samuel Bagster and Sons, M.DCCC.XLI [1841].

Evelyn, John. The diary of John Evelyn. With an introduction & notes by Austin Dobson. 1906; rpt. London and New York: Macmillan, 1908.

Evelyn, John, trans. An essay on the first book of T. Lucretius Carus de rerum natura. Interpreted and made English verse by J. Evelyn esq;. London: Printed for Gabriel Bedle, and Thomas Collins, and are to be sold at their shop at the Middle-Temple-Gate in Fleetstreet, 1656.

Evelyn, John. Fumifugium, or, the inconveniencie of the aer and smoak of London dissipated. Together with some remedies humbly proposed by J. E. esq; to His Sacred Majestie, and to the Parliament now assembled. London: Printed by W. Godbid for Gabriel Bedel and Thomas Collins, and are to be sold at their shop at the Middle Temple Gate neer Temple-Bar, MDCLXI [1661].

Evelyn, John. “How to make the printers inke.” From chapter 4 of The construction of the rowling press, and manner how to worke off the plates. MS., read to The Royal Society of London for the Improving of Natural Knowledge on 14 May 1662.

A complete digital transcription of Evelyn’s recipe is available as a She-philosopher.com 2nd-window aside for the compilation of early-modern recipes for making ink in the STUDIES section. You can link to it from there.

Evelyn, John, trans. An idea of the perfection of painting: demonstrated from the principles of art, and by examples conformable to the observations, which Pliny and Quintilian have made upon the most celebrated pieces of the antient painters, parallel’d with some works of the most famous modern painters, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Julio Romano, and N. Poussin. Written in French by Roland Freart, Sieur de Cambray, and rendred English by J. E. Esquire, Fellow of the Royal Society. In the Savoy: Printed for Henry Herringman at the sign of the Anchor in the lower-walk of the New-Exchange, 1668.

Evelyn, John. Navigation and commerce, their original and progress. Containing a succinct account of traffick in general. Its benefits and improvements. Of discoveries, wars, and conflicts at sea, from the original of navigation to this day, with special regard to the English nation. Their several voyages and expeditions, to the beginning of our late differences with Holland. In which His Majesties title to the dominion of the sea is asserted, against the novel, and later pretenders. London: Printed by T. R. for Benj. Tooke, at the Sign of the Ship in St. Pauls Churchyard, 1674.

Evelyn, John. Numismata. A discourse of medals, ancient and modern. Together with some account of heads and effigies of Illustrious, and famous persons, in sculps, and taille-douce, of whom we have no medals extant; and of the use to be derived from them. To which is added A digression concerning physiognomy. By J. Evelyn, Esq; S.R.S. London: Printed for Benj. Tooke at the Middle-Temple-Gate, in Fleetstreet, MDCXCVII [1697].

Evelyn, John. Observations on Venatores, conducted in Rome. In Micrographia: or some physiological descriptions of minute bodies made by magnifying glasses with observations and inquiries thereupon. By Robert Hooke. London: Printed by Jo. Martyn and Ja. Allestry, Printers to the Royal Society, and are to be sold at their Shop at the Bell in S. Paul’s Church-yard, 1665. 200-202.

Evelyn, John, trans. A parallel of the antient architecture with the modern, in a collection of ten principal authors who have written upon the five orders, viz. Palladio and Scamozzi, Serlio and Vignola; D. Barbaro and Cataneo, L. B. Alberti and Viola; Bullant and De Lorme, compared with one another. The three Greek orders, Dorique, Ionique, and Corinthian, comprise the first part of this treatise. And the two Latine, Tuscan and Composita the latter. Written in French by Roland Freart, sieur de Chambray; made English for the benefit of builders. To which is added An account of architects and architecture, in an historical, and etymological explanation of certain tearms particularly affected by architects. With Leon Baptista Alberti’s treatise Of statues. By John Evelyn Esq; fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed by Tho. Roycroft for John Place, and are to be sold at his shop at Furnivals-Inn Gate in Holborn, MDCLXIV [1664].

Evelyn, John. Pomona, or an appendix concerning fruit-trees, in relation to cider, the making and several ways of ordering it. 2nd edn. London: Printed by John Martyn and James Allestrye, printers to the Royal Society, 1670.

Evelyn, John. Sculptura: or the history, and art of chalcography and engraving in copper. With an ample enumeration of the most renowned masters, and their works. To which is annexed a new manner of engraving, or mezzo tinto, communicated by his Highness Prince Rupert to the authour of this treatise. London: Printed by J.C. for G. Beedle, and T. Collins, at the Middle-Temple Gate, and J. Crook in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1662.

Evelyn, John, and William Upcott, ed. The miscellaneous writings of John Evelyn, esq. F.R.S. Author of Sylva, or a discourse of forest trees; Memoirs, &c. Now first collected, with occasional notes, by William Upcott, of the London Institution. London: Henry Colburn, New Burlington-Street, 1825.

Everard, John, trans. The divine pymander of Hermes Mercurius Trismegistus. In XVII books. Translated formerly out of the Arabick into Greek, and thence into Latine, and Dutch, and now out of the original [Arabic] into English, by that learned divine Doctor Everard. London: Printed by Robert White, for Thos. Brewster & Greg. Moule, at the Three Bibles in the Poultry, under Mildred’s Church, 1650.

Everard, John. The gospel-treasury opened: or the holiest of all unvailing. Discovering yet more the riches of grace and glory to the vessels of mercy: unto whom onely it is given to know the mysteries of that kingdom and the excellency of spirit, power, truth above letter, forms, shadows. In several sermons preached at Kensington & elswhere by John Everard D.D. deceased. Whereunto is added, the mystical divinity of Dionysius the Areopagite, spoken of Acts 17:34 with collections out of other divine authors, translated by Dr. Everard, never before printed in English. London: Printed by John Owsley for Rapha Harford, 1657.

Everard, John, and Rapha Harford, ed. Some Gospel-treasures opened: or, the holiest of all unvailing: discovering yet more the riches of grace and glory, to the vessels of mercy: unto whom onely it is given to know the mysteries of that kingdom, and the excellency of spirit[,] power[,] truth above letter[,] forms[,] shadows. In several sermons preached at Kensington and elswhere, by John Everard D.D. deceased. Whereunto is added, the mystical divinity of Dionysius the Areopagite, spoken of Acts 17.34. with collections out of other divine authors, translated by Dr. Everard, never before printed in English. London: Printed by R. W[hite] for Rapha Harford [and H. Harford], at the Bible and States-Arms in Little Brittain, 1653.

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ornament  primary texts: FJ

Fane, Mildmay. Mildmay Fane’s “Raguaillo d’Oceano,” 1640, and “Candy restored,” 1641. Ed. by Clifford Leech. Materials for the Study of the Old English Drama, xv. Louvain: Uystpruyst, 1938; rpt. Vaduz, Liechtenstein: Kraus Reprint, 1963.

Fane, Mildmay. The poems of Mildmay, 2d earl of Westmoreland. London, 1648. Ed. by Alexander B. Grosart. Blackburn, Eng.: [s. n.], 1879.

Fanshawe, Anne. Memoirs of Lady Fanshawe, wife of Sir Richard Fanshawe, bt.[,] ambassador from Charles II. to the courts of Portugal & Madrid. Written by herself. Containing extracts from the correspondence of Sir Richard Fanshawe. Edited with an introduction by Beatrice Marshall and a note upon the illustrations by Allan Fea. Edited by Beatrice Marshall and Allan Fea. London and New York: John Lane, MDCCCCV [1905].

Firth, C. H., ed. The life of William Cavendish duke of Newcastle. To which is added The true relation of my birth, breeding, and life by Margaret, duchess of Newcastle. Edited by C. H. Firth, M.A. (editor of “Memoirs of the life of Colonel Hutchinson”). With four etched portraits. London: John C. Nimmo, 1886.

Flecknoe, Richard. The diarium, or journall: divided into 12. jornadas in burlesque rhime, or drolling verse, with divers other pieces of the same author. London: Printed for Henry Herringman at the sign of the Anchor in the lower walk of the New-Exchange, 1656.

Flecknoe, Richard. Epigrams of all sorts written by Richard Flecknoe. London: Printed for the author, 1669.

Flecknoe, Richard. Euterpe revived, or, epigrams made at several times in the years 1672, 1673, & 1674 on persons of the greatest honour and quality most of them now living: in III books. London: are to be sold by the booksellers of London and Westminster, 1675.

Flecknoe, Richard. A farrago of several pieces being a supplement to his poems, characters, heroick pourtraits, letters, and other discourses formerly published by him. Newly written by Richard Flecknoe. London: Printed for the author, 1666.

Flecknoe, Richard. The preface to the reader. In Love’s dominion: a dramatique piece full of excellent moralitie, written as a pattern for the reformed stage. London: [s.n.], 1654.

Flecknoe, Richard. A relation of ten years travells in Europe, Asia, Affrique, and America. All by way of letters occasionally written to divers noble personages, from place to place; and continued to this present year. By Richard Fleckno. With divers other historical, moral, and poetical pieces of the same author. London: Printed for the author, and are to be sold by, [1656?].

Original issue of Flecknoe’s A Relation of Ten Years Travells in Europe, Asia, Affrique, and America. An HTML transcription of Letters XXIII and XXIV from this text is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. FLECK1656.

Flecknoe, Richard. A short discourse of the English stage. In Love’s kingdom: a pastoral trage-comedy. Not as it was acted at the theatre near Lincolns-Inn, but as it was written, and since corrected. By Richard Flecknoe; with a short treatise of the English stage, &c. by the same author. London: Printed by R. Wood for the author, 1664.

Flecknoe, Richard. A true and faithful account of what was observed in ten years travells into the principal places of Europe, Asia, Africa and America. Written in several letters to noble personages from place to place, as they were observed, with variety of historical and moral peices. By R. F. Esq;. London: Printed for William Crook at the Three Bibles on Fleet-Bridge, 1665.

The 2nd printing of Flecknoe’s A Relation of Ten Years Travells in Europe, Asia, Affrique, and America.

Fontenelle, M. de [Bernard le Bovier]. Conversations on the plurality of worlds (Entretiens sur la pluralité des mondes). Trans. by H. A. Hargreaves. Introd. by Nina Rattner Gelbart. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990.

Foresti, Jacopo Filippo, da Bergamo. De plurimis claris sceletisque mulieribus. Ferrara: Laurentius de Rubeis de Valentia, 1497.

Fuller, Thomas. The history of the worthies of England, who for parts and learning have been eminent in the several counties. Together with an historical narrative of the native commodities and rarities in each county. Endeavoured by Thomas Fuller, D.D. London: Printed by J. G. W. L. and W. G. for Thomas Williams, and are to be sold at the sign of the Bible in Little Britain, 1662.

Galilei, Galileo. Dialogo di Galileo Galilei Linceo matematico sopraordinario del lo studio di Pisa. E filosofo, e matematico primario del serenissimo Gr. Duca di Toscana. Doue ne i congressi di quattro giornate si discorre sopra i due massimi sistemi del mondo Tolemaico, e Copernicano; proponendo indeterminatamente le ragioni filosofiche, e naturali tanto per l’una, quanto per l’altra parte. Con privilege in fiorenza, per Gio: Batista Landini MDCXXXII [1632].

Gardiner, William, trans. Conversations on the plurality of worlds ... Translated from the last Paris edition ... by W. Gardiner. By Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle. London, 1715.

Gerard, John. The herball or generall historie of plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London master in chirurgerie. Imprinted at London: by [Edm. Bollifant for [Bonham Norton and] John Norton, 1597.

Gerard, John, rev. and enl. by Thomas Johnson. The herball or generall historie of plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London master in chirurgerie very much enlarged and amended by Thomas Johnson citizen and apothecarye of London. London: Printed by Adam Islip[,] Joice Norton and Richard Whitakers, anno 1633.

Gerard, John, rev. and enl. by Thomas Johnson. The herball or generall historie of plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London master in chirurgerie very much enlarged and amended by Thomas Johnson citizen and apothecarye of London. London: Printed by Adam Islip[,] Joice Norton and Richard Whitakers, anno 1636.

Gildon, Charles. The history of the Athenian Society, for the resolving all nice and curious questions. By a gentleman who got secret intelligence of their whole proceedings. To which are prefixed several poems, written by Mr. Tate, Mr. Motteux, Mr. Richardson, and others. London: Printed for James Dowley, and are to be sold by the booksellers of London and Westminster, [1692].

Gildon, Charles. Miscellaneous letters and essays, on several subjects. Philosophical, moral, historical, critical, amorous, &c. in prose and verse. London: For Benjamin Bragg, 1694.

Glanvill, John, trans. A plurality of worlds. Written in French by the author of the Dialogues of the dead. Translated into English by Mr. Glanvill. By Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle. London: Printed for R. Bentley and S. Magnes, 1688.

Glanvill, Joseph. Plus Ultra: or, the progress and advancement of knowledge since the days of Aristotle. In an account of some of the most remarkable late improvements of practical, useful learning: to encourage philosophical endeavours. Occasioned by a conference with one of the Notional Way. London: Printed for James Collins at the Kings-Head in Westminster Hall, 1668.

Glover, Thomas. “An account of Virginia, its scituation, temperature, productions, inhabitants, and their manner of planting and ordering tobacco, etc. Communicated by Mr. Thomas Glover, an ingenious chirurgion that hath lived some years in that country.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London 11.126 (20 June 1676): 623–636.

Gough, Richard. Anecdotes of British topography. Or, an historical account of what has been done for illustrating the topographical antiquities of Great Britain and Ireland. London: Printed by W. Richardson and S. Clark, and sold by T. Payne, at the Mews Gate, and W. Brown, in Fleet Street, MDCCLXVIII [1768].

Gough, Richard. British topography. Or, an historical account of what has been done for illustrating the topographical antiquities of Great Britain and Ireland. 2 vols. London: Printed for T. Payne and Son, and J. Nichols, MDCCLXXX [1780].

Granger, James. A biographical history of England, from Egbert the Great to the Revolution: consisting of characters disposed in different classes, and adapted to a methodical catalogue of engraved British heads: intended as an essay towards reducing our biography to system, and a help to the knowledge of portraits; interspersed with variety of anecdotes, and memoirs of a great number of persons, not to be found in any other biographical work: with a preface, shewing the utility of a collection of engraved portraits to supply the defect, and answer the various purposes, of medals: by the Rev. J. Granger, vicar of Shiplake, in Oxfordshire. 4 vols. London: printed for T. Davies, in Russel-street; J. Robson, Bond-street; G. Robinson, Pater-Noster-Row; T. Becket, T. Cadell, and T. Evans, in the Strand, 1775.

Green, Mary Anne Everett, ed. Calendar of state papers, domestic series, 1657–8, preserved in the state paper department of Her Majesty’s Public Record Office. London: Longmans & Co., et al., 1884.

Grew, Nehemiah. Musæum Regalis Societatis. Or a catalogue & description of the natural and artificial rarities belonging to the Royal Society and preserved at Gresham Colledge. Made by Nehemjah Grew M.D. Fellow of the Royal Society, and of the Colledge of Physitians. Whereunto is subjoyned the comparative anatomy of stomachs and guts. By the same author. London: Printed by W. Rawlins, for the author, 1681.

Grew, Nehemiah. New experiments, and useful observations concerning sea-water made fresh according to the patentees invention: in a discourse humbly dedicated to His Majesty, the King of Great-Britain, &c. By a fellow of the Colledge of Physicians, and of the Royal-Society. [London: s.n.], 1683.

Grew, Nehemiah. New experiments and useful observations concerning sea-water made fresh according to the patentees invention: in a discourse humbly dedicated to His Majesty, the King of Great Britain, &c. By Nehemiah Grew, M.D. Fellow of the Colledge of Physicians, and of the Royal-Society. The ninth edition, Septemb. 29. London: printed by John Harefinch in Mountague-Court in Little Britain, 1684.

Grey, Richard. Memoria technica: or, a new method of artificial memory, applied to and exemplified in chronology, history, geography, astronomy. Also Jewish, Grecian and Roman coins, weights and measures &c. With tables proper to the respective sciences; and memorial lines adapted to each table. London: Printed for Charles King in Westminster-Hall, MDCCXXX [1730].

Hakluyt, Richard. The principall navigations, voiages and discoveries of the English nation, made by sea or over land, to the most remote and farthest distant quarters of the earth at any time within the compasse of these 1500. yeeres: devided into three severall parts, according to the positions of the regions wherunto they were directed. The first, conteining the personall travels of the English unto Judaea, Syria, Arabia, the river Euphrates, Babylon, Balsara, the Persian Gulfe, Ormuz, Chaul, Goa, India, and many islands adjoyning to the south parts of Asia: together with the like unto Egypt, the chiefest ports and places of Africa within and without the Streight of Gibralter, and about the famous promontorie of Buona Esperanza. The second, comprehending the worthy discoveries of the English towards the north and northeast by sea, as of Lapland, Scrikfinia, Corelia, the Baie of S. Nicholas, the Isles of Colgoieve, Vaigats, and Nova Zembla toward the great river Ob, with the mightie empire of Russia, the Caspian Sea, Georgia, Armenia, Media, Persia, Boghar in Bactria, & divers kingdoms of Tartaria. The third and last, including the English valiant attempts in searching almost all the corners of the vaste and new world of America, from 73. degrees of northerly latitude southward, to Meta Incognita, Newfoundland, the maine of Virginia, the point of Florida, the Baie of Mexico, all the inland of Nova Hispania, the coast of Terra Firma, Brasill, the river of Plate, to the Streight of Magellan: and through it, and from it in the South Sea to Chili, Peru, Xalisco, the Gulfe of California, Nova Albion upon the backside of Canada, further then ever any Christian hitherto hath pierced. Whereunto is added the last most renowmed [sic] English navigation, round about the whole globe of the earth. By Richard Hakluyt Master of Artes, and student sometime of Christ-church in Oxford. Imprinted at London: By George Bishop and Ralph Newberie, deputies to Christopher Barker, printer to the Queenes most excellent Majestie, 1589.

Hakluyt, Richard. The principal navigations, voyages, traffiques and discoveries of the English nation, made by sea or over-land, to the remote and farthest distant quarters of the earth, at any time within the compasse of these 1600 yeres: divided into three severall volumes, according to the positions of the regions, whereunto they were directed. The first volume containeth the worthy discoveries, &c. of the English toward the north and northeast by sea, as of Lapland, Scriksinia, Corelia, the Baie of S. Nicolas, the isles of Colgoieve, Vaigatz, and Nova Zembla, toward the great river Ob, with the mighty empire of Russia, the Caspian Sea, Georgia, Armenia, Media, Persia, Boghar in Bactria, and divers kingdomes of Tartaria: together with many notable monuments and testimonies of the ancient forren trades, and of the warrelike and other shipping of this realme of England in former ages. The second volume comprehendeth the principall navigations, voyages, traffiques, and discoveries of the English nation made by sea or over-land, to the south and south-east parts of the world, as well within as without the Streight of Gibralter, at any time within the compasse of these 1600. yeres: divided into two several parts, &c. By Richard Hakluyt preacher, and sometime student of Christ-Church in Oxford. 2nd edn. Imprinted at London: By George Bishop, Ralph Newberie, and Robert Barker, Anno 1599[–1600].

Hariot, Thomas. A briefe and true report of the new found land of Virginia of the commodities there found and to be raysed, as well marchantable, as others for victuall, building and other necessarie uses for those that are and shalbe the planters there; and of the nature and manners of the naturall inhabitants: discovered by the English colony there seated by Sir Richard Greinvile Knight in the yeere 1585. which remained under the government of Rafe Lane Esquier, one of her Maiesties Equieres, during the space of twelve monethes: at the speciall charge and direction of the Honourable Sir Walter Raleigh Knight, Lord Warden of the stanneries; who therein hath beene favored and authorised by her Maiestie and her letters patents: directed to the adventurers, favourers, and welwillers of the action, for the inhabiting and planting there: by Thomas Hariot; servant to the abovenamed Sir Walter, a member of the Colony, and there imployed in discovering. London: [By R. Robinson], 1588.

Hariot’s Report, a little quarto volume privately printed in February 1589 N.S., was in fact an “epitome” (akin to an executive summary) of a much more detailed Chronicle documenting his experience and survey of the area then known as Virginia (present-day North Carolina, into Virginia), conducted in that Algonquian country from June 1585 to June 1586.
   The Report was rushed into print to defend Sir Walter Ralegh’s interest from those who “woulde seeme to knowe so much as no men more,” and who “had little understanding, lesse discretion, and more tongue then was needful or requisite.” With such slanders abroad, there was an urgent need to promote the Virginia enterprise, since the Assignment of Ralegh’s Charter was set to expire by the limitation of six years on 24 March 1590 if no colonists had been shipped or plantation attempted.
   Hariot intended to follow up his summary Report with publication of the entire Chronicle, but never quite got around to it (self-promotion by way of publication was never a priority for Hariot, leaving many of his scientific colleagues frustrated that so little about his research, discoveries, and inventions was known to the learned world).
   Unfortunately, Hariot’s original Virginia MS. is lost. Hariot’s Report was reprinted by Richard Hakluyt in his The Principall Navigations, Voiages and Discoveries of the English Nation (1589), and reissued in a lavishly-illustrated edition by Theodore de Bry in 1590 (reprinted many times thereafter), but “all the fruits of our labours” documented in Hariot’s unpublished Chronicle of pre-Anglo-Virginia will probably never be known.

Hariot, Thomas, and Theodore de Bry. A briefe and true report of the new found land of Virginia; of the commodities and of the nature and manners of the naturall inhabitants. Discovered by the English colony there seated by Sir Richard Greinvile Knight in the yeere 1585. Which rem[ai]ned under the governement of twelve monethes, at the speciall charge and direction of the honourable Sir Walter Raleigh Knight lord Warden of the stanneries who therein hath beene favoured and authorised by her Maiestie and her letters patents. This fore booke is made in English by Thomas Hariot servant to the abovenamed Sir Walter, a member of the Colony, and there imployed in discovering. Franckfort: Inprinted by Jhon Wechel, at Theodore de Bry, owne coast and chardges, MDXC [1590].

3rd English edn. (1590) of Hariot’s Virginia narrative of 1588, issued by Theodore de Bry, of Frankfort-on-the-Main.
   De Bry’s edition of Hariot’s Report was printed in four languages (English, French, German, and Latin), and was illustrated with a map and a series of 22 plates expertly engraved by de Bry, after the original watercolors made in Virginia by Hariot’s companion, John White, expedition artist for Ralegh’s Roanoke voyages.
   Each plate is accompanied by a brief description, apparently by Hariot (although some scholars have attributed these to White), with the gloss “translated out of Latin into English by Richard Hackluit,” as explained by de Bry on the divisional title-page (sig. E1r) introducing the new section of “true pictures” appended to his illustrated edn. of Hariot’s Report.

Harris, John. Astronomical dialogues between a gentleman and a lady. Wherein the doctrine of the sphere, uses of the globes, and the elements of astronomy and geography are explain’d, in a pleasant, easy and familiar way. With a description of the famous instrument, called the orrerry. London: Printed by T. Wood for Benj. Cowse, at the Rose and Crown in St. Paul’s Churchyard, 1719.

Harris, John. Lexicon technicum: or, an universal English dictionary of arts and sciences explaining not only the terms of art, but the arts themselves. 2 vols. London: Printed for Dan. Brown, Tim Goodwin, John Walthoe, Tho. Newborough, John Nicholson, Tho. Benskin, Benj. Tooke, Dan Midwinter, Tho. Leigh, and Francis Coggan, 1704–10.

Harris, John. Navigantium atque itinerantium bibliotheca: or, A compleat collection of voyages and travels: consisting of above four hundred of the most authentick writers; beginning with Hackluit, Purchass, &c. in English; Ramusio in Italian; Thevenot, &c. in French; De Bry, and Grynæi novus orbis in Latin; the Dutch East-India Company in Dutch: ... Also ... the charters, acts of Parliament, &c. about the East-India trade ... To which is prefixed, a history of the peopling of the several parts of the world, and particularly of America.... 2 vols. London: Printed for Thomas Bennet, John Nicholson, and Daniel Midwinter, 1705.

Harris, John, rev. by a Society of Gentlemen. A supplement to Dr. Harris’s Dictionary of arts and sciences; explaining not only the terms in physics, metaphysics, ethics, theology, history, geography, antiquity, chronology, grammar, rhetoric, logic, poetry, pharmacy, medicine, chymistry, surgery, phytology, war, polity, navigation, architecture, painting, sculpture, music, commerce, trade, husbandry, manage, horticulture, &c. &c. &c. but also the arts and sciences themselves: together with a just account of the origin, progress, and state of things, offices, officers, and orders, ecclesiastical, civil, military, and commercial; the several sects, systems, doctrines, and opinions of divines, heresiarchs, schismatics, philosophers, mathematicians, physicians, critics, antiquaries, &c. Also an account of all sacred books and writings; history of general and particular councils; all solemnities, rites, ceremonies, fasts, feasts, statutes, laws, plays, sports, games, habits, and utensils: in all which, (as likewise in metaphysics, theology, antiquity, grammar, rhetoric, poetry, polity, and other miscellaneous subjects,) this book is of itself entirely compleat, and more copious and extensive than any work of this kind, not excepting Mr. Chambers’s Cyclopaedia, of which it is a very great improvement, containing upwards of eleven hundred articles which that author has omitted; besides great additions and improvements in almost every article; and will, with Dr. Harris’s two volumes, make the most useful set of books, and compleat body of arts and sciences yet extant: being carefully compiled from the best and most approved authors in several languages; enriched with many curious manuscripts, and illustrated with copper-plates. N. B. Those subjects in which Dr. Harris is any way deficient are here perfected; no trifling and insignificent words inserted, but only such as may convey some useful and entertaining knowledge to the reader; for whose further benefit and satisfaction, all the authors made use of in this work are quoted. By a Society of Gentlemen. Utile dulci. London: Printed for the authors; and sold by M. Cooper, in Pater-noster-Row; J. Clarke and T. Comyns under the Royal-Exchange; C. Bathurst, in Fleet-Street; T. Gardner, opposite St. [Clement’s] Church in the Strand; and most other Booksellers in Town and Country, M,DCC,XLIV [1744].

Hartlib, Samuel. The reformed common wealth of bees. Presented in severall letters and observations to Sammuel Hartlib, esq. With The reformed Virginian silk-worm. Containing many excellent and choice secrets, experiments, and discoveries for attaining of national and private profits and riches. London: Printed for Giles Calvert at the Black-Spread-Eagle at the West-end of Pauls, 1655.

Hartlib, Samuel. The true and ready way to learn the Latin tongue, 1654. English linguistics, 1500–1800: a collection of facsimile reprints, no. 280. Menston: Scolar Press, 1971.

Harvey, William. Exercitatio de motu cordis et sanguinis (On the motions of the heart and blood). Amsterdam, 1628.

Hawkins, John. A true declaration of the troublesome voyadge of M. John Haukins to the parties of Guynea and the west Indies, in the yeares of our Lord 1567. and 1568. Imprinted at Londo[n]: In Poules Churchyarde, by Thomas Purfoote for Lucas Harrison, dwelling at the signe of the Crane, Anno. 1569.

[Head, Richard]. The floating island: or, a new discovery relating the strange adventure on a late voyage, from Lambethana to Villa Franca, alias Ramallia, to the eastward of Terra del Templo, by three ships, viz. the Pay-naught, the Excuse, the Least-in-sight, under the conduct of Captain Robert Owe-much, describing the nature of the inhabitants, their religion, laws and customs. Published by Franck Careless, one of the discoverers. [London: s.n.], 1673.

Heylyn, Peter. Cosmographie in four books. Containing the chorographie and historie of the whole world, and all the principall kingdomes, provinces, seas and isles thereof. London: Printed for Henry Seile, and are to be sold at his shop over against Saint Dunstans Church in Fleetstreet, MDCLII [1652].

Additional printings in 1657, 1665, 1666, 1669, 1670, 1674 (x2), 1677 (x2), and 1682.

Heylyn, Peter. Microcosmus [Mikrókosmos], or a little description of the great world. A treatise historicall, geographicall, politicall, theologicall. By P. H. At Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield, and James Short printers to the famous Universitie, 1621.

Additional printings in 1625, 1627, 1629, 1631, 1633, 1636, and 1639.

Hobbes, Thomas. A briefe of the art of rhetorique. Containing in substance all that Aristotle hath written in his three bookes of that subject except onely what is not applicable to the English tongue. London: Printed by Tho. Cotes, for Andrew Crook, and are to be sold at the black Bare in Pauls Church-yard, [1637?].

An HTML transcription of this 1st English edn. of Hobbes’s Latin digest of Aristotle’s Rhetoric — an executive summary of the art & science of persuasion, intended as an aid for the courtier-politician (such as his Cavendish patrons, the earls of Devonshire and Newcastle) — is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. THOB1637.

Hobbes, Thomas. A brief of the art of rhetorick. Containing in substance all that Aristotle hath written in his three books of that subject, except onely what is not applicable to the English tongue. In A compendium of the art of logick and rhetorick in the English tongue. Containing all that Peter Ramus, Aristotle, and others have writ thereon: with plaine directions for the more easie understanding and practice of the same. London: Printed by Thomas Maxey, 1651. 135–282.

2nd edn. The anonymously-compiled A Compendium of the Art of Logick and Rhetorick in the English Tongue reprints 4 treatises on the subject, only one of which is by Hobbes: the 1st, on logic, reprints Robert Fage’s Peter Ramus ... his Dialectica in Two Bookes (1632); the 2nd, on rhetoric, is a reprint of Hobbes’s A Briefe of the Art of Rhetorique (c.1637); the 3rd, another overview of rhetoric, reproduces the second part of Dudley Fenner’s The Artes of Logike and Rethorike (1584); and the 4th, on sophistry, reprints the last part of the same text by Fenner. (Mary C. Dodd, “The Rhetorics in Molesworth’s Edition of Hobbes,” 38)
   Some scholars believe that A Compendium may have been compiled and/or edited by Hobbes himself, as I explain at greater length elsewhere.

Hobbes, Thomas. A briefe of the art of rhetorique, retitled The whole art of rhetorick. In The art of rhetoric, with A discourse of the laws of England. By Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury. London: Printed for William Crooke at the Green Dragon without Temple-Bar, 1681.

This 3rd edn. of Hobbes’s A Briefe was combined with the same 2 treatises from Fenner’s The Artes of Logike and Rethorike as printed earlier in the 1651 A Compendium — “The Art of Rhetoric Plainly Set Forth with Pertinent Examples ...” and “The Rules of Sophistry” — and reissued posthumously as The Whole Art of Rhetorick (half-title, p. 1).

Hobbes, Thomas. A briefe of the art of rhetorique. In Hobbes’s translation of Aristotle’s Art of rhetorick. A new edition. With alterations, and a new preface by a gentleman. London: Printed for M. Thrush, at the King’s-Arms, Salisbury-Court, Fleet-Street, MDCCLIX [1759].

4th edn. of Hobbes’s A Briefe. This 18th-century reissue reprints the original A Briefe (c.1637) in 3 books, without the additions from Fenner (concerning “Tropes and Figures” and “a short discovery of some little tricks of false and deceitful Reasoning”) printed with Hobbes’s A Briefe in 1651 and 1681.

Hobbes, Thomas. Decameron physiologicum: or, Ten dialogues of natural philosophy. By Thomas Hobbes of Malmsbury. To which is added The proportion of a straight line to half the arc of a quadrant. By the same author. London: Printed by J. C. for W. Crook at the Green Dragon without Temple-Bar, 1678.

Hobbes, Thomas, trans. Eight bookes of the Peloponnesian Warre written by Thucydides the sonne of Olorus. Interpreted with faith and diligence immediately out of the Greeke by Thomas Hobbes secretary to ye late Earle of Devonshire. London: Imprinted [at Eliot’s Court Press] for Hen: Seile, and are to be sold at the Tigres Head in Paules Churchyard, 1629.

Hobbes, Thomas. Humane nature: or, The fundamental elements of policie. Being a discoverie of the faculties, acts, and passions of the soul of man, from their original causes, according to such philosophical principles as are not commonly known or asserted. By Tho. Hobbs of Malmsbury. London: Printed by T. Newcomb, for Fra: Bowman of Oxon, 1650.

This work was dedicated to William Cavendish, then the “Earl of Newcastle, Governour to the Prince his Highness, One of His Majesties most honorable Privie Councel” (sig. A5r).

Hobbes, Thomas. Letter to the Duke of Newcastle, 20 Aug. 1645. In A letter about liberty and necessity: written to the Duke of Newcastle. By Thomas Hobbes. With observations upon it by a learned Prelate of the Church of England lately deceased. London: Printed by J. Grover for W. Crooke, at the Green Dragon without Temple-Bar, 1676. 1–23.

Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan, or The matter, forme, & power of a common-wealth ecclesiasticall and civill. By Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury. London: Printed for Andrew Crooke, at the Green Dragon in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1651.

Holder, William. Elements of speech: an essay of inquiry into the natural production of letters: with an Appendix concerning persons deaf & dumb. By William Holder D.D. Fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed by T. N. for J. Martyn printer to the R. Society, at the Bell without Temple-Barr, 1669.

Holme, Randle. The academy of armory, or, A storehouse of armory and blazon. Containing the several variety of created beings, and how born in coats of arms, both foreign and domestick. With the instruments used in all trades and sciences, together with their terms of art. Also the etymologies, definitions, and historical observations on the same, explicated and explained according to our modern language. Very usefel [sic] for all gentlemen, scholars, divines, and all such as desire any knowledge in arts and sciences. By Randle Holme, of the city of Chester, gentleman sewer in extraordinary to his late Majesty King Charles 2. And sometimes deputy for the kings of arms. Chester: Printed for the author, MDCLXXXVIII [1688].

Hooke, Robert. An attempt for the explication of the phænomena observable in an experiment published by the Honourable Robert Boyle, Esq; in the XXXV. experiment of his epistolical discourse touching the aire. In confirmation of a former conjecture made by R. H. London: Printed by J. H. for Sam. Thomson at the Bishops Head in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1661.

Also known as: Tract on Capillary Attraction.

Hooke, Robert. An attempt to prove the motion of the earth from observations made by Robert Hooke Fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed by T. R. for John Martyn Printer to the Royal Society, at the Bell in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1674.

Hooke, Robert. The diary of Robert Hooke, 1672–1680. Transcribed from the original in the possession of the Corporation of the City of London (Guildhall Library). Eds. Henry W. Robinson and Walter Adams. 1935; rpt. London: Wykeham Publications, 1968.

Hooke, Robert, and William Derham, ed. “Dr. Hook’s conjectures about the odd phaenomena observable in the shell-fish called the Nautilus.” In three parts, read to the Royal Society on: 2 Dec. 1696, 16 Dec. 1696, and 23 Dec. 1696. Philosophical experiments and observations of the late eminent Dr. Robert Hooke, S.R.S. and geom. prof. Gresh. and other eminent virtuoso’s in his time. With copper plates. Publish’d by W. Derham, F.R.S. London: Printed by W. and J. Innys, printers to the Royal Society, at the west end of St. Paul’s, MDCCXXVI [1726]. 304–314.

A complete digital transcription of Hooke’s 3-part lecture, “Conjectures about ... the Nautilus,” is available as three She-philosopher.com 2nd-window asides for the introductory essay on Robert Hooke in THE PLAYERS section. You can link to all 3 files from there.

Hooke, Robert, and Henry Oldenburg, ed. “Inquiries for Turky.” Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London 1.20 (17 Dec. 1666): 360–362.

A complete digital transcription of Hooke’s list of inquiries for travelers to Turkey is available as a She-philosopher.com 2nd-window aside for the editor’s introductory essay on Richard Flecknoe’s mid-17th-century journey to Brazil (Lib. Cat. No. FLECK1656). You can link to it from there.

Hooke, Robert, and William Derham, ed. “An instrument of use to take the draught, or picture of any thing. Communicated by Dr. Hook to the Royal Society, Dec. 19, 1694.” Philosophical experiments and observations of the late eminent Dr. Robert Hooke, S.R.S. and geom. prof. Gresh. and other eminent virtuoso’s in his time. With copper plates. Publish’d by W. Derham, F.R.S. London: Printed by W. and J. Innys, printers to the Royal Society, at the west end of St. Paul’s, MDCCXXVI [1726]. 292–296.

Hooke, Robert. Lampas: or, descriptions of some mechanical improvements of lamps & waterpoises. Together with some other physical and mechanical discoveries. Made by Robert Hooke, Fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed for John Martyn, Printer to the Royal Society, at the Bell in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1677.

Hooke, Robert. “Lecture explicating the memory, and how we come by the notion of time.” Read at meetings of the Royal Society, May–June 1682. In The posthumous works of Robert Hooke containing his Cutlerian lectures, and other discourses, read at the meetings of the illustrious Royal Society. Illustrated with sculptures. To these discourses is prefixt the author’s life, giving an account of his studies and employments: with an enumeration of the many experiments, instruments, contrivances and inventions, by him made and produc’d as curator of experiments to the Royal Society. Publish’d by Richard Waller. London: Printed by S. Smith and B. Walford, 1705. 138–148.

A PDF transcription of Hooke’s 1682 Lecture on memory is available in the she-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. DTP2003.

Hooke, Robert. Lectures and collections made by Robert Hooke, Secretary of the Royal Society. Cometa. Containing {Observations of the comet in April, 1677. Fragments of several lectures about those of 1664. and 1665. Sir Chr. Wren’s hypothesis and geometrical problem about those comets. A discourse concerning the comet of 1677. Mr. Boyle’s observation made on two new phosphori of Mr. Baldwin, and Mr. Craft. Mr. Gallet’s letter to Mr. Cassini, together with his observation of [Mercury] sub [the sun]. Mr. Cassini’[s] reflections upon those of Gassendus, and Hevelius, and upon this. Mr. Hally’s letter and observation of the same made at St. Hellena. Mr. Cassini’s observation of the diurnal motion of [Jupiter], and other changes happening in it.} Microscopium. Containing {Mr. Leeuwenhoeck’s two letters concerning some late microscopical discoveries. The author’s discourse and description of microscopes, improved for discerning the nature and texture of bodies. P. Cherubine’s accusations answered. Mr. Young’s letter containing several anatomical observations.} London: Printed for J. Martyn, Printer to the Royal Society, at the Bell in St. Paul’s Church-yard, 1678.

Hooke, Robert. Micrographia: or some physiological descriptions of minute bodies made by magnifying glasses with observations and inquiries thereupon. London: Printed by Jo. Martyn and Ja. Allestry, Printers to the Royal Society, and are to be sold at their Shop at the Bell in S. Paul’s Church-yard, 1665.

Hooke, Robert. Philosophical experiments and observations of the late eminent Dr. Robert Hooke, S.R.S. and geom. prof. Gresh. and other eminent virtuoso’s in his time. With copper plates. Publish’d by W. Derham, F.R.S. London: Printed by W. and J. Innys, printers to the Royal Society, at the west end of St. Paul’s, MDCCXXVI [1726].

Hooke, Robert. The posthumous works of Robert Hooke, M.D. S.R.S. Geom. Prof. Gresh. &c. Containing his Cutlerian lectures, and other discourses, read at the meetings of the illustrious Royal Society. In which I. The present deficiency of natural philosophy is discoursed of, with the methods of rendering it more certain and beneficial. II. The nature, motion and effects of light are treated of, particularly that of the sun and comets. III. An hypothetical explication of memory; how the organs made use of by the mind in its operation may be mechanically understood. IV. An hypothesis and explication of the cause of gravity, or gravitation, magnetism, &c. V. Discourses of earthquakes, their causes and effects, and histories of several; to which are annext, physical explications of several of the fables in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, very different from other mythologick interpreters. VI. Lectures for improving navigation and astronomy, with the descriptions of several new and useful instruments and contrivances; the whole full of curious disquisitions and experiments. Illustrated with sculptures. To these discourses is prefixt the author’s life, giving an account of his studies and employments, with an enumeration of the many experiments, instruments, contrivances and inventions, by him made and produc’d as curator of experiments to the Royal Society. Publish’d by Richard Waller, R. S. Secr. London: Printed by Sam. Smith and Benj. Walford (printers to the Royal Society) at the Princes Arms in St. Paul’s Church-yard, 1705.

A digital transcription of Hooke’s digression on the nautilus in his “Discourse of Earthquakes,” No. 3 (series of lectures read to the Royal Society between 8 Dec. 1686 and 19 Jan. 1687), as printed in Waller’s edn. of Hooke’s Posthumous Works, is available as a She-philosopher.com 2nd-window aside for the introductory essay on Robert Hooke in THE PLAYERS section. You can link to it from there.

Houghton, John. A proposal for improvement of husbandry and trade. London: s.n., 1691.

Howell, James. A discours of Dunkirk, with some reflexes upon the late surrender therof, &c. And other additions, by a knowing and very worthy person. London: Printed by J. C. for Samuel Speed, at the Rainbow in Fleetstreet, 1664.

Howell, James. Epistolae Ho-elianae. Familiar letters domestic and forren; divided into six sections, partly historicall, politicall, philosophicall, upon emergent occasions: by J. H. Esq;: one of the clerks of his Majesties most honourable privy councell. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley; and are to be sold at his shop at the Prince’s Arms in S. Pauls Church-yard, 1645.

1st edn. (1645).

Howell, James. Epistolae Ho-elianae. Familiar letters domestic and forren; divided into sundry sections, partly historicall, politicall, philosophicall, upon emergent occasions: by James Howell Esq; one of the clerks of his late Ma[jes]ties most hon[oura]ble privy councell. The second edition, enlarged with divers supplements, and the dates annexed which were wanting in the first, with an addition of a third volume of new letters. London: Printed by W. H. for Humphrey Mosely, and are to be sold at his shop at the Princes Arms in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1650.

2nd edn., enlarged (1650).

Howell, James. Instructions for forreine travell. Shewing by what cours, and in what compasse of time, one may take an exact survey of the kingdomes and states of christendome, and arrive to the practicall knowledge of the languages, to good purpose. London: Printed by T. B. for Humprey Mosley, at the Princes Armes, in Paules Church-yard, 1642.

Howell, James. Londinopolis; an historicall discourse or perlustration of the city of London, the imperial chamber, and chief emporium of Great Britain: whereunto is added another of the city of Westminster. With the courts of justice, antiquities, and new buildings thereunto belonging. By Jam Howel, Esq;. London: Printed by J. Streater, for Henry Twiford, George Sawbridge, Th and John Place, and are to be sold at their shops, 1657.

Howell, James. Paroimiographia. Proverbs, or, Old sayed sawes & adages, in English (or the Saxon toung) Italian, French and Spanish whereunto the British, for their great antiquity, and weight are added. Which proverbs are either Moral, relating to good life; Physical, relating to diet, and health; Topical, relating to particular places; Temporal, relating to seasons; or Ironical, relating to raillery, and mirth, &c. Collected by J. H., Esqr. London: Printed by J. G., 1659.

Howell, James. The vision: or a dialog between the soul and the bodie, fancied in a morning-dream. London: Printed for William Hope at the Blue Anchor on the North side of the Royal Exchange, Anno. Dom. 1651.

Hutchinson, Lucy Apsley. Letter to Lord Anglesey. 1675. In Lucy Hutchinson’s translation of Lucretius: De rerum natura. Ed. by Hugh de Quehen. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. 23–27.

An HTML transcription of Hutchinson’s epistle dedicatory is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. HUTCH1675.

Hutchinson, Lucy Apsley. Lucy Hutchinson’s translation of Lucretius, De rerum natura. Ed. by Hugh de Quehen. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996.

Hutchinson, Lucy. Memoirs of the life of Colonel Hutchinson, governor of Nottingham. By his widow Lucy. Edited from the original manuscript by the Rev. Julius Hutchinson. To which are added the letters of Colonel Hutchinson and other papers. Revised with additional notes by C. H. Firth, M.A. New edition, revised by Professor Firth. Ed. by C. H. Firth. London: George Routlege & Sons, Ltd., 1906.

Hutchinson, Lucy. Memoirs of the life of Colonel Hutchinson, written by his widow, Lucy. Ed. by Harold Child. London: Kegan, Paul, Trench, 1904.

An HTML transcription of Lucy Hutchinson’s retelling of events embroiling William Cavendish, marquess (subsequently duke) of Newcastle, and his old adversary, the regicide Colonel Hutchinson, in October 1663 (from Hutchinson’s The Life of John Hutchinson of Owthorpe in the County of Nottinghamshire, written c. 1664–1671), is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. HUTCH1671.

Huygens, Constantijn. Correspondence, 1649–1663. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1916. Vol. 5. of De Briefwisseling van Constantijn Huygens (1608–1687). Ed. by J. A. Worp. 6 vols. ’s-Gravenhage: Martinus Nijhoff, 1911–1917.

Hyde, Edward. The history of the rebellion and civil wars in England, begun in the year 1641. With the precedent passages, and actions, that contributed thereunto, and the happy end, and conclusion thereof by the king’s blessed restoration, and return upon the 29th of May, in the year 1660. Written by the right honourable Edward earl of Clarendon, late Lord High Chancellour of England, privy counsellour in the reigns of King Charles the First and the Second. 3 vols. Oxford: printed at the Theater, An. Dom. [1702–04].

Jarvis, William, ed. A choice manual of rare and select secrets in physick and chyrurgery; collected, and practised by the Right Honorable, the Countesse of Kent, late deceased. As also most exquisite ways of preserving, conserving, dandying, &c. Published by W. J. gent. London: Printed by G. D. for William Shears, 1653.

Jarvis, William, comp. A true gentlewomans delight. Wherein is contained all manner of cookery: together with preserving, conserving, drying and candying, very necessary for all ladies and gentlewomen. Published by W. I. gent. London: Printed by G. D. and are to be sold by William Shears, at the Sign of the Bible in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1653.

This title is often found bound with Jarvis’s edn. of the Countess of Kent’s A Choice Manual of Rare and Select Secrets in Physick and Chyrurgery.

Jinner, Sarah. An almanack or prognostication for the year of our Lord 1658: being the second after bissextile or leap year: calculated for the meridian of London, and may indifferently serve for England, Scotland, and Ireland. London: Printed by J. Streater for the Company of Stationers, 1658.

Jinner, Sarah. An almanack and prognostication for the year of our Lord 1659. London: Printed by J. S. for the Company of Stationers, [1659].

Jones, Philip, trans. Certaine briefe, and speciall instructions for gentlemen, merchants, students, souldiers, marriners, &c. employed in services abrode, or anie way occasioned to converse in the kingdomes, and governementes of forren princes. By Albertus Meierus. London: Printed by John Woolfe, 1589.

Jonson, Ben. The alchemist. A comoedie. First produced, 1610; first printed, 1612. Ed. by S. Musgrove. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1968.

Juana Inés de la Cruz, Sor. Obras completas. Eds. Alfonso Méndez Plancarte and Alberto G. Salceda. 4 vols. México City: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1951–1957.

Juana Inés de la Cruz, Sor. Primero sueño [First dream]. Trans. and introd. by Alan S. Trueblood. In A Sor Juana anthology. Foreword by Octavio Paz. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988. 166–195.

Juana Inés de la Cruz, Sor. Respuesta a sor Filotea de la Cruz. Trans. and introd. by Margaret Sayers Peden. In A woman of genius: the intellectual autobiography of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Salisbury, Conn.: Lime Rock Press, 1982. 17–183.

An excerpt from Sor Juana’s Respuesta de la poetisa a la muy ilustre Sor Filotea de la Cruz is available in Spanish and English translation (HTML transcription) in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. JUA1691.

Juana Inés de la Cruz, Sor. Selección from Sueño (The dream) and other poems. Trans. and introd. by Frank J. Warnke. In Three women poets renaissance and baroque: Louise Labé, Gaspara Stampa, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press; London and Toronto: Associated University Presses, 1987. 116–129.

Juana Inés de la Cruz, Sor. Selected poemas de amor. Trans. and introd. by Jaime Manrique and Joan Larkin. In Sor Juana’s love poems/poemas de amor. 1997; rpt. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2003.

Juana Inés de la Cruz, Sor. Selected Villancicos, 1676–1691. Trans. and introd. by Alan S. Trueblood. In A Sor Juana anthology. Foreword by Octavio Paz. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1988. 122–145.

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ornament  primary texts: KO

Keith, George. An exhortation & caution to Friends concerning buying or keeping of negroes. [New York: Printed by William Bradford, 1693].

A digital reissue (2014) of George Keith’s An Exhortation & Caution to Friends Concerning Buying or Keeping of Negroes (1693), ed. by Deborah Taylor-Pearce, is available in the Roses​.Communicating​By​Design​.com Historical Section.

Kippis, Andrew, and Rev. Joseph Towers, et al., eds. Biographia Britannica: or, the lives of the most eminent persons who have flourished in Great Britain and Ireland, from the earliest ages, to the present times: collected from the best authorities, printed and manuscript, and digested in the manner of Mr. Bayle’s Historical and critical dictionary. The second edition, with corrections, enlargements, and the addition of new lives: by Andrew Kippis, D.D. and F.S.A. With the assistance of other gentlemen. 5 vols. London: Printed by W. and A. Strahan; for C. Bathurst, W. Strahan, J. Rivington and Sons, L. Davis, G. Keith, T. Longman, B. Law, E. and C. Dilly, T. Cadell, G. Robinson, J. Robson, T. Evans, S. Fox, J. Nichols, Whieldon and Waller, H. Gardner, and W. Otridge, [1778-1793].

Kircher, Athanasius. Athanasii Kircheri Fuldensis Buchonii e Soc Jesu Presbyteri; olim in Herbipolensi, & Avenionensi Societatis Jesu gymnasiis orientalium linguarum, & matheseos, nunc huius in Romano Collegio professoris ordinarii. Ars magna lucis et umbrae in decem libros digesta. Quibus admirandae lucis et umbrae in mundo, atque adeò universa natura, vires effectus[que] uti nova, ita varia novorum reconditiorum [que] speciminum exhibitione, ad varios mortalium usus, panduntur. Cum privilegio Sacr. Caesar. Majestatis. Romae: Sumptibus Hermanni Scheus, ex typographia Ludouici Grignani, superiorum permissu, MDCXLVI [1646].

Kircher, Athanasius. Athanasii Kircheri ... Ars magna lucis et umbrae, in X. libros digesta. Quibus admirandae lucis & umbrae in mundo, atque adeò universa natura, vires effectusque uti nova, ita varia novorum reconditiorumque speciminum exhibitione, ad varios mortalium usus, panduntur. Editio altera priori multò auctior. Amstelodami: Apud Joannem Janssonium à Waesberge, & haeredes Elizaei Weyerstraet, 1671.

Kircher, Athanasius. Athanasii Kircheri e Soc. Jesu Ars magna sciendi, in XII libros digesta, qua nova & universali methodo per artificiosum combinationum contextum de omni re proposita plurimis & prope infinitis rationibus disputari, omniumque summaria quaedum cognitio comparari potest. Ad Augustissimum Rom. Imperatorem Leopoldum Primum, Justum, Pium, Felicem. Amstelodami: Apud Joannem Janssonium a Waesberge, & Viduam Elizei Weyerstraet, 1669.

Kircher, Athanasius. Athanasii Kircheri e Soc. Jesu China monumentis, qua sacris quà profanis, nec non variis naturæ & artis spectaculis, aliarumque rerum memorabilium argumentis illustrata, auspiciis Leopoldi Primi roman. imper. semper augusti, munificentissimi mecænatis. Amstelodami: apud Jacobum à Meurs, in sossa vulgò de Keysersgracht, MDCLXVII [1667].

A digital edition of Kircher’s China monumentis (complete text) is now available online through the ECHO (European Cultural Heritage Online) project.

Kircher, Athanasius. China illustrata. Amsterdam, 1667. Trans. Charles D. Van Tuyl. Muskogee, OK: Indian University Press, 1987.

Kircher, Athanasius. Athanasii Kircheri fuldensis Magnes, sive, De arte magnetica. Opus tripartitum. Quo præterquam quod universa magnetis natura, eiusque in omnibus artibus & scientiis usus nova methodo explicetur. é viribus quoque & prodigiosis effectibus magneticarum, aliarumque abditarum naturæ motionum in elementis, lapidibus, plantis, animalibus elucescentium, multa hucusque incognita naturæ arcana per physica, medica, chymica & mathematica omnis generis experimenta recluduntur. Romae: Ex typographia Ludouici Grignani, sumptibus Hermanni Scheus, 1641.

Kircher, Athanasius. Athanasii Kircheri e Soc. Jesu Mundus subterraneus, in xii libros digestus; quo divinum subterrestris mundi opificium, mira ergasteriorum naturæ in eo distributio, verbo [pantamorphon [romanized form]] Protei regnum, universæ denique naturæ majestas & divitiæ summa rerum varietate exponuntur. Abditorum effectuum causæ acri indagine inquisitæ demonstrantur; cognitæ per artis & naturæ conjugium ad humanæ vitæ necessarium usum vario experimentorum apparatu, necnon novo modo, & ratione applicantur. Amstelodami: Apud Joannem Janssonium & Elizeum Weyerstraten, 1665.

Kircher, Athanasius. Athanasii Kircheri fuldensis e Soc Jesu presbyteri Musurgia universalis sive ars magna consoni et dissoni in X libros digesta. Quà universa sonorum doctrina, & philosophia, musicaeque tam theoricae, quam pacticae scientia, summa varietate traditur; admirandae consoni, & dissoni in mundo, adeòque universà naturà vires effectusque, uti nova, its peregrina variorum speciminum exhibitione ad singulares usus, tum in omnipoenèfacultate, tum potissimùm in philologìa, mathematicà, physicà, mechanicà, politicà, metaphysicà, theologià, aperiuntur & demonstrantur. 2 vols. Romae: Ex typographia Haeredum Francisci Corbeletti, Anno Jubilaei, MDCL [1650].

Knight, W. D., trans. A discourse of the plurality of worlds. Written in French, by the most ingenious author of the dialogues of the dead. And translated into English by Sir W. D. Knight. By Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle. Dublin: And. Crook and Sam. Helsham for William Norman Book-binder to His Grace the Duke of Ormond, 1687.

La Feuille, Daniel de, and Heinrich Offelen. Devises et emblemes anciennes & modernes, tireés de plus celebres auteurs. Oder: Emblematische gemüths-vergnügung, bey betrachtung sieben hundert und funffzehen der curieusesten und ergötzlichsten sinn-bildern, mit ihren zuständigen Teutsch-Lateinisch-Französisch- und Italianischen beyschrifften. Vierdte aussfertigung. Augspurg: Lorentz Kroniger und Gottlieb Göbels Seel. Erben, 1699.

Langbaine, Gerard. An account of the English dramatick poets, or, some observations and remarks on the lives and writings of all those that have publish’d either comedies, tragedies, tragi-comedies, pastorals, masques, interludes, farces or opera’s in the English tongue. By Gerard Langbaine. Oxford: Printed by L. L. for George West and Henry Clements, 1691.

Leaming, Aaron, Jacob Spicer, and the General Assembly of the New Jersey Legislature. The grants, concessions, and original constitutions of the province of New-Jersey. The acts passed during the proprietary governments, and other material transactions before the surrender thereof to Queen Anne. The instrument of surrender, and her formal acceptance thereof. Lord Cornbury’s commission and instructions consequent thereon. Collected by some gentlemen employed by the General Assembly. And afterwards published by virtue of an act of the Legislature of the said province. With proper tables alphabetically digested, containing the principal matters in the book. By Aaron Leaming and Jacob Spicer. Philadelphia, PA: Printed by W. Bradford, printer to the King’s Most Excellent Majesty for the province of New Jersey, 1758. 2nd edn. Somerville, NJ: Honeyman and Co., 1881.

Linschoten, Jan Huygen van. John Huighen van Linschoten his discours of voyages into ye Easte & West Indies. Devided into foure bookes. Trans. by William Phillip. Printed at London: By [John Windet for] John Wolfe printer to ye honorable Cittie of London, [1598].

London, William. A catalogue of the most vendible books in England, orderly and alphabetically digested under the heads of divinity, history, physick and chyrurgery, law, arithmetick, geometry, astrology, dialling, measuring land and timber, gageing, navigation, architecture, horsmanship, faulconry, merchandize, limning, military discipline, heraldry, fortifications and fire-works, husbandry, gardening, romances, poems, playes, &c. With Hebrew, Greek and Latine for schools and scholars. The like work never yet performed by any. Also, all sorts of globes, mapps of the world or in parts, either kingdoms, provinces, or particular counties; French and Dutch picture and landskips; paper of all sorts from 5s to 5lb a reame; the best perfumed India, and English wax, &c. All to be sold by the author at his shop in New-Castle. Varietas Delectat. London: [n.p.,] printed in the year 1657.

Lovelace, Richard. Lucasta: epodes, odes, sonnets, songs, &c. To which is added Aramantha, a pastorall. By Richard Lovelace, Esq. London: Printed by Tho. Harper, and are to be sold by Tho. Ewster, at the Gun, in Ivie Lane, 1649.

Lovelace, Richard. Lucasta: posthume poems of Richard Lovelace, esq:. London: Printed by William Godbid for Clement Darby, 1659.

Lovelace, Richard. Lucasta. The poems of Richard Lovelace, esq. Now first edited, and the text carefully revised. With some account of the author, and a few notes, by W. Carew Hazlitt, of the Inner Temple, barrister-at-law. London: John Russell Smith, 1864.

Lupton, Thomas. A thousand notable things, of sundry sortes. Wherof some are wonderfull, some straunge, some pleasant, divers necessary, a great sort profitable and many very precious. This booke bewrayes that some had rather hide, which who so buyes, their money is not lost: for many a thing therin, if truely tride, wil gaine much more, the[n] twenty such will cost. And divers else great secretes will detect, and other moe of rare or straunge effect. It is not made to please some one degree, no, no, nor yet to bring a gaine to few: for each thereby, how rich or poore they bee, may reape much good, & mischiefes great eschew. The paines and travell hethertoo is mine: the gaine and pleasure henceforth will be thine. Imprinted at London: By John Charlewood, for Hughe Spooner, dwelling in Lumbardstreete at the signe of the Cradle, [1579].

M., R. Newes of Sr. Walter Rauleigh. With the true description of Guiana: as also a relation of the excellent government, and much hope of the prosperity of the voyage. Sent from a gentleman of his fleet, to a most especially friend of his in London. From the river of Caliana, on the coast of Guiana, Novemb. 17. 1617. London: Printed for H. G. and are to be sold by I. Wright, at the signe of the Bible without New-gate, 1618.

Maguel, Francis. “Report of Francis Maguel. June 21, 1610.” Original in the General Archives of Simancas; Department of State, Volume 2587, Folio 98. Trans. and printed as Item CXXXI in The Genesis of the United States. A narrative of the movement in England, 1605-1616, which resulted in the plantation of North America by englishmen, disclosing the contest between England and Spain for the possession of the soil now occupied by the United States of America; set forth through a series of historical manuscripts now first printed together with a reissue of rare contemporaneous tracts, accompanied by bibliographical memoranda, notes, and brief biographies. Collected, arranged, and edited by Alexander Brown. 2 vols. 1890; rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1964. i. 393-9.

An HTML transcription of Maguel’s 1610 Report is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. MAG1610.

[Makin, Bathsua]. An essay to revive the antient education of gentlewomen, in religion, manners, arts & tongues. With an answer to the objections against this way of education. London: Printed by J. D., to be sold by Tho. Parkhurst, at the Bible and Crown at the lower end of Cheapside, 1673.

[Makin, Bathsua]. An essay to revive the ancient education of gentlewomen in religion, manners, arts & tongues. With an answer to the objections against this way of education. London, 1673. Rpt. in Bathsua Makin, woman of learning. Ed. by Frances N. Teague. Lewisburg: Bucknell UP; London: Associated University Presses, 1998. 109–50.

Marolles, Michel de, with illustrations by Abraham van Diepenbeeck. Tableaux du temple des muses. Tirez du cabinet de feu Mr Favereu, Conseiller du Roy en sa Cour des Aydes, & gravez en tailles-douce par les meilleurs maistres de son temps, pour representer les vertus & les vices, sur les plus illustres fables de l’antiquité. Avec les descriptions, remarques & annotations composées par Mre Michel de Marolles, Abbé de Villeloin. A Paris: Chez Nicolas L’Anglois, ruë Sainct Iacques, aux Colomnes d’Hercule, avec Privilege du Roy, 1655.

Marolles, Michel de, rev. Antoine de La Barre de Beaumarchais. The temple of the muses; or, the principal histories of fabulous antiquity, represented in sixty sculptures; designed and ingraved by Bernard Picart le Romain, and other celebrated masters. With explications and remarks, which discover the true meaning of the fables, and their foundation in history. Amsterdam: Printed for Zachariah Chatelain, MDCCXXXIII [1733].

Marvell, Andrew. The rehearsal transpros’d; or, Animadversions upon a late book, intituled, a preface shewing what grounds there are of fears and jealousies of popery. The second edition, corrected. London: Printed by A. B. for the assigns of John Calvin and Theodore Beza, at the sign of the Kings Indulgence, on the south-side of the Lake Lemane, 1672.

Mayerne, Théodore Turquet de. [“Generoso viro, equitiaurato, archiatro regio, D. Gulielmo Paddy: Theodorus de Mayerne, eques auratus, Baro Albonae, in aulâ Britannicâ archiatrorum comes, S. P. D.”] “To the noble knight, and the kings chief physician, Dr. William Paddy: Theodore Mayerne, knight, baron of St. Albons, and companion to the chief physicians in the court of Britian, wisheth much health.” Epistle dedicatory to The theater of insects: or, lesser living creatures. As, bees flies, caterpillars, spidrs [sic], worms, &c. a most elaborate work. By Tho. Mouffet, doctor in physick. Vol. 2 of The history of four-footed beasts and serpents ... collected out of the writings of Conradus Gesner and other authors, by Edward Topsell. Whereunto is now added, The theater of insects, or, lesser living creatures: as bees, flies, caterpillars, spiders, worms, &c. A most elaborate work: by T. Muffet, Dr. of physick. The whole revised, corrected and inlarged .... London: Printed by E. Cotes for G. Sawbridge at the Bible on Ludgate-Hill, T. Williams at the Bible in Little-Britain, and T. Johnson at the Key in Pauls Church yard, MDCLVIII [1658].

Merian, Maria Sibylla. Metamorphosis insectorum surinamensium. In qua erucae ac vermes surinamenses, cum omnibus suis transformationibus, ad vivum delineantur & describuntur, singulis eorum in plantas, flores & fructus collocatis, in quibus reperta sunt; tum etiam generatio ranarum, bufonum rariorum, lacertarum, serpentun, araneorum & formicarum exhibetur; omnia in America ad vivum naturali magnitudine picta atque descripta per Mariam Sibyllam Merian. Amstelodami: sumtibus Auctoris, venduntur & apud Gerardum Valk, 1705.

Moffett, Thomas. Insectorum sive minimorum animalium theatrum: olim ab Edoardo Wottono[,] Conrado Gesnero[,] Thomaque Pennio inchoatum: tandem Tho. Moufeti Londinatis operâ sumptibusq; maximis concinnatum, auctum, perfectum: et ad vivum espressis iconibus suprà quingentis illustratum. Ed. by Sir Theodore Mayerne. Londini: Ex officina typographica Thom. Cotes. Et venales extant apud Benjam. Allen, in diverticulo, quod Anglicè dicitur Popes-head Alley, 1634.

Montaigne, Michel de. The complete essays of Montaigne. Trans. and ed. by Donald M. Frame. 1948; Stanford: Stanford UP, 1958.

Moxon, Joseph. Enneades arithmeticae, the numbring nines. Or, Pythagoras his table extended to all whole numbers under 10000 and the numbring rods of the Right Honourable John Lord Nepeer, enlarged with 9999 fixt columns or rods, of single, double, triple, and quadruple figures, and with a new sort of double and moveable rods, for the much more sure, plain and easie performance of multiplication, division, and extraction of roots. The whole being very useful for most persons, of whatsoever calling and employment, in all arts and sciences. All having frequent occasions of accompts, numbring, measuring, surveying, gauging, weighing, demonstrating, &c. The devine wisdom having from the beginning disposed all things in measure, number and weight, Sap. 11.21. London: Printed for Joseph Moxon, at the sign of Atlas in Ludgate-street. Where also these numbring rods, (commonly call’d Napiers Bones) are made and sold, 1684.

Moxon, Joseph. Mathematicks made easie: or, A mathematical dictionary, explaining the terms of art, and difficult phrases used in arithmetick, geometry, astronomy, astrology, and other mathematical sciences. Wherein the true meaning of the word is rendred, the nature of things signified discussed, and (where need requires) illustrated with apt figures and diagrams. With an appendix, exactly containing the quantities of all sorts of weights and measures: the characters and meaning of the marks, symbols, or abbreviations commonly used in algebra. And sundry other observables. By Joseph Moxon, a member of the Royal Society, and hydrographer to the King’s most excellent majesty. London: Printed for Joseph Moxon, at the Sign of Atlas on Ludgate-Hill, M.DC.LXXIX [1679].

Moxon, Joseph. Mechanick exercises, or, the doctrine of handy-works. Began Jan. 1. 1677. and intended to be monthly continued. By Joseph Moxon hydrographer to the Kings most excellent majesty. 2 vols. London: Printed for Joseph Moxon at the sign of Atlas on Ludgate-Hill, 1677[–1683].

Moxon, Joseph. Moxon’s Mechanick exercises. Ed. by Theodore Low De Vinne. 2 vols. New York: The Typothetæ of the city of New York, 1896.

Moxon, Joseph. Mechanick exercises on the whole art of printing, 1683–4. Eds. Herbert Davis and Harry Carter. London: Oxford University Press, 1962.

Moxon, Joseph. Regulæ trium ordinum literarum typographicarum: or The rules of the three orders of print letters: viz. the Roman[,] Italick[,] English[,] capitals and small. Shewing how they are compounded of geometrick figures, and mostly made by rule and compass. Useful for writing masters, painters, carvers, masons, and others that are lovers of curiosity. By Joseph Moxon, hydrographer to the Kings most excellent majesty. London: Printed for Joseph Moxon, on Ludgate Hill at the sign of Atlas, 1676.

Moxon, Joseph. Regulae trium ordinum literarum typographicarum or The rules of the three orders of print letters: viz. the Roman[,] Italick[,] English[,] capitals and small. Shewing how they are compounded of geometrick figures, and mostly made by rule and compass. Useful for writing masters, painters, carvers, masons, and others that are lovers of curiosity. By Joseph Moxon, a member of the Royal Society and hydrographer to the Kings most excellent majesty. The seccond [sic] edition. London: Printed for James Moxon, at the sign of Atlas in Warwick Lane, and at his shop at the 3 Bells in Ludgatestriet [sic], at the West end of St. Pauls Church, 1693.

This 2nd edn. of Moxon’s Regulæ Trium Ordinum Literarum Typographicarum was posthumously reissued in 1693 by Joseph’s son, James Moxon. (Joseph died in 1691.)

Newton, Isaac. Philosophiæ naturalis principia mathematica. Autore Is. Newton, Trin. Coll. Cantab. Soc. Matheseos Professore Lucasiano, & Societatis Reglis Sodali. Imprimatur S. Pepys, Reg. Soc. Praeses. Julii 5. 1686. Londini: Jussu Societatis Regiae ac Typis Josephi Streater. Prostat apud plures Bibliopolas, Anno MDCLXXXVII [1687].

Nicéron, Jean François. La perspective curievse, ou, Magie artificielle des effets merveilleux de l’optique ... la catoptrique ... la dioptrique ... par Jean François Nicéron. Paris: Pierre Billaine, 1638.

O’Dowde, Thomas. The poor mans physician the true art of medicine as it is prepared and administred for the healing of all diseases incident to mankind, by Thomas O Dowde Esq; one of the grooms of the chamber to his sacred Majesty King Charles the Second. London: s.n., 1664.

O’Dowde, Thomas. The poor man’s physician, or The true art of medicine, as it is chymically prepared and administred, for healing the several diseases incident to mankind. The third edition. By Thomas O Dowde, Esquire, one of the grooms of the chamber to his sacred Majesty King Charles the Second. London: Printed for F. Smith, at the Elephant and Castle without Temple-Bar, 1665.

As noted in the title, this printing of 1665 was the 3rd edn. Earlier edns. of O’Dowde’s book date from at least 1659, when the “small octavo” was advertised by the bookseller-publisher Simon Miller at the end of his new translation of Roger Bacon’s De mirabili potestate artis et naturae, Englished as Frier Bacon His Discovery of the Miracles of Art, Nature, and Magick.

Ogilby, John. America: being the latest, and most accurate description of the new world, containing the original of the inhabitants, and the remarkable voyages thither. The conquest of the vast empires of Mexico and Peru and other large provinces and territories, with the several European plantations in those parts. Also their cities, fortresses, towns, temples, mountains, and rivers. Their habits, customs, manners, and religions. Their plants, beasts, birds, and serpents. With an appendix containing, besides several other considerable additions, a brief survey of what hath been discover’d of the unknown south-land and the arctick region. Collected from most authentick authors, augmented with later observations, and adorn’d with maps and sculptures by John Ogilby Esq; His Majesty’s cosmographer, geographick printer, and master of the revels in the kingdom of Ireland. 2nd edn. London: Printed by the author, and are to be had at his house in White Fryers, MDCLXXI [1671].

Ogilby, John. The entertainment of his most Excellent Majestie Charles II, in his passage throughout the City of London to his coronation: containing an exact accompt of the whole solemnity; the triumphal arches, and cavalcade, delinated in sculpture; the speeches and impresses illustrated from antiquity. To these is added, a brief narrative of his Majestie’s solemn coronation: with his magnificent proceding, and royal feast in Westminster-Hall. By John Ogilby. [London]: Printed for Richard Mariot, and Thomas Dring, and are to be sold at their shops in Fleet-street, M D CLXII [1662].

Oldenburg, Henry. Excerpt from “An accompt of some books. ... II. Description anatomique d’un cameleon, d’un castor, d’un dromedaire, d’un ours, et d’une Gazelle. A Paris 1669. in 4º.” Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London 4.49 (1669): 991–996.

An HTML transcription of Oldenburg’s book review is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. OLD1669.

Oliver, William. “A letter from Dr William Oliver to the publisher, giving his remarks in a late journey into Denmark and Holland.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 23.285 (1702–3): 1400–1410.

One of that sex. Advice to the women and maidens of London: shewing, that instead of their usual pastime, and education in needle-work, lace, and point-making, it were far more necessary and profitable to apply themselves to the right understanding and practice of the method of keeping books of account: whereby, either single, or married, they may know their estates, carry on their trades, and avoid the danger of a helpless and forlorn condition, incident to widows. With some essays, or rudiments for young beginners, in twelve articles. By one of that sex. London: Printed for Benjamin Billingsley at the Printing press in Cornhill, 1678.

Overton, Richard. An appeale from the degenerate representative body the Commons of England assembled at Westminster: to the body represented, the free people in general of the several counties, cities, townes, burroughs, and places within this kingdome of England, and dominion of Wales. And in especiall, to his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairfax (Captaine Generall) and to all the officers and souldiers under his command. By Richard Overton, prisoner in the infamous goale of Newgate, for the liberties and freedomes of England. London: Printed in the yeare, 1647.

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ornament  primary texts: PT

Paré, Ambroise, and Thomas Johnson, trans. “The figure of a Chameleon.” In The workes of that famous chirurgion Ambrose Parey translated out of Latine and compared with the French. By Th: Johnson. London: Printed by Th: Cotes and R. Young, anno 1634. 1024.

An HTML transcription of Paré’s essay on the chameleon, as Englished by Thomas Johnson, is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. PARE1634.

Peele, George. The honour of the garter. Displaied in a poeme gratulatorie: entitled to the worthie and renowned Earle of Northumberland. Created Knight of that order, and installd at Windsore. Anno Regni Elizabethæ. 35. die Junii. 26. By George Peele, Maister of Artes in Oxenforde. At London: Printed by the widdowe Charlewood, for John Busbie, and are to be sold at the west doore of Paules, [1593].

Pepys, Samuel. The diary of Samuel Pepys: a new and complete transcription. Transcribed and ed. by Robert Latham and William Matthews. 11 vols. 1970–1983; rpt. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2000.

Pepys, Samuel. Samuel Pepys’s Naval minutes. Ed. by J. R. Tanner. Publications of the Navy Records Society, vol. 60. [London]: Naval Records Society, 1926.

Perrinchief, Richard. The life and death of King Charles the first, written by Dr. R. Perinchief: together with [Eikon basilike]. Representing His sacred Majesty in his solitudes and sufferings. And a vindication of the same King Charles the martyr. Proving him to be the author of the said [Eikon basilike], against a memorandum of the late earl of Anglesey, and against the groundless exceptons of Dr. Walker and others. London: Printed for H. Hindmarsh, at the Golden-Ball over against the Royal Exchange, 1697.

Petty, William. The advice of W. P. to Mr. Samuel Hartlib for the advancement of some particular parts of learning. London: [s.n.], 1648.

Petty, William. A declaration concerning the newly invented art of double writing. Wherein are expressed the reasons of the authors proceedings in procuring a priviledge for the same: as also of the time, manner, and price, of the discovery of the said art, and of the instruments belonging thereunto. For the satisfaction of all that desire to be partakers of the great benefit of the same, before they adventure anything towards the reward thereof. Whereunto is annexed a copie of an ordinance of both houses of Parliament, approving the feasibility and great use of the said invention, and allowing a priviledge to the inventor, for the sole benefit thereof for 14 years, upon the penalty of one hundred pounds. London: Printed by R. L. for R. W. at the Star under Saint Peters Church in Cornhill, 1648.

Petty, William. The discourse made before the Royal Society the 26. of November, 1674. Concerning the use of duplicate proportion in sundry important particulars: together with a new hypothesis of springing or elastique motions. By Sir William Petty, Kt. Fellow of the said Society. Pondere, mensura, & numero deus omnia fecit: Mensuram & pondus numeres, numero omnia fecit. London: Printed for John Martyn, 1674.

This work was dedicated to William Cavendish, “Lord Duke of Newcastle” (sig. A3r).

Petty, William. Hiberniae delineatio quoad hactenus licuit, perfectissima studio Guilielmi Petty Eq: aurati. [London: s.n., 1685.]

Porta, Giambattista della. Jo. Batis. Portae Neap. De humana physiognomia li. VI. In quibus docetur quom[odo] animi propentes naturalibus remediis compesci possint. Neapoli: Apud Tarquinium Longum. Sumptibus Pauli Venturini, bibliopolae Parthenopei, MDCII [1602].

Powell, Thomas. Humane industry: or, A history of most manual arts, deducing the original, progress, and improvement of them. Furnished with variety of instances and examples, shewing forth the excellency of humane wit. London: Printed for Henry Herringman, and are to be sold at his shop, at the Blew-Anchor, in the Lower walk of the New-Exchange, 1661.

Pratt, William. The arithmeticall jewell: or The use of a small table; whereby is speedily wrought, as well all arithmeticall workes in whole numbers, as all fractional operations, without fraction or reduction. Invented by William Pratt. Published by his Maiesties Priviledge, granted to the inventor, under the great seale of England. London: Printed by John Beale, and are to be sold by Nicholas Bourne, at his shop, at the Royall Exchange, 1617.

Purchas, Samuel. Hakluytus posthumus or Purchas his pilgrimes. Contayning a history of the world in sea voyages and lande travells, by Englishmen and others. Wherein Gods wonders by nature & providence, the actes, arts, varieties & vanities of men, w[i]th a world of the worlds rarities, are by a world of eyewitnesse-authors, related to the world. Some left written by Mr Hakluyt at his death. More since added. His also perused & perfected. All examined, abreviated, illustrated w[i]th notes, enlarged w[i]th discourses. Adorned w[i]th pictures, and expressed in mapps. In fower parts, each containing five bookes. By Samuel Purchas B.D. 4 vols. London: Imprinted for Henrie Fetherstone, at the signe of the Rose in Pauls Churchyard, 1625.

Purchas, Samuel. Purchas his pilgrimage. Or relations of the world and the religions observed in all ages and places discovered, from the creation unto this present. In foure partes. This first containeth a theologicall and geographicall historie of Asia, Africa, and America, with the ilands adiacent. Declaring the ancient religions before the Floud, the heathenish, Jewish, and Saracenicall in all ages since, in those parts professed, with their severall opinions, idols, oracles, temples, priestes, fasts, feasts, sacrifices, and rites religious: their beginnings, proceedings, alterations, sects, orders, and successions. With briefe descriptions of the countries, nations, states, discoveries, private and publike customes, and the most remarkable rarities of nature, or humane industrie, in the same. By Samuel Purchas, minister at Estwood in Essex. Unus Deus, una Veritas. London: Printed by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, and are to be sold at his shoppe in Pauls Church-yard at the signe of the Rose, 1613.

Quarles, Francis. Emblemes. By Fra. Quarles. London: Printed by G. M. and sold at John Marriots shope in St. Dunstons church yard Fleetstreet, 1635.

[Ralegh, Walter, Sir]. The history of the world. At London: Printed for Walter Burre, 1614.

Ralegh, Walter, Sir. The history of the world. In five bookes. Intreating of the beginning and first ages of the same from the creation unto Abraham. Of the times from the birth of Abraham, to the destruction of the temple of Solomon. From the destruction of Jerusalem, to the time of Philip of Macedon. From the reigne of Philip of Macedon, to the establishing of that kingdome, in the race of Antigonus. From the setled rule of Alexanders successors in the East, untill the Romans (prevailing over all) made conquest of Asia and Macedon. By Sir Walter Ralegh, knight. At London: Printed by William Jaggard[, W. Stansby and N. Okes] for Walter Burre, and are to be sold at his shop in Paules Churchyard at the signe of the Crane, 1617.

Ranchin, François, and Henri Gras, ed. Commentarius in Hippocratis jusjurandum, cum Is. Casauboni notis. In Praelectionum Monspeliensium tomus primus. In quo continentur, commentarius in Hippocratis jusjurandum, cum Is. Casauboni notis. Pathologia universalis ... Tractatus de crisibus ... Cura et studio Henrici Grassi. Montpellier: Jean Gilet, 1618.

Ranchin, François, and Henri Gras, ed. Francisci Ranchini, consiliarii, medici & professoris regii, celeberrimaeque Universitatis Monspeliensis cancellarii amplissimi in Hippocratis jusjurandum commentarius. In Francisci Ranchini, consiliarii, medici, et professoris regii, celeberrimaeque Universitatis Monspeliensis judicis & cancellarii, Opuscula medica; utili, jocundáque rerum varietate reserta. In gratiam philiatron publici juris facta, cura & studio Henrici Gras, Phil. & Med. Doctoris Monspeliensis, & practici lugdunensis aggregati. Cum amplissimis capitum, sectionum & rerum praecipuarum indicibus. Lugduni: apud Petrum Ravaud, in via Mercatoria, sub signo Sancti Petri, M.DC.XXVII [1627]. 15–42.

Ranchin, François, and Yuhanna ibn Msawaih [Mesue]. Oeuvres pharmaceutiques de M. Francois Ranchin, conseiller, medecin et professeur du roy, chancelier en l’Université de Medecine à Montpelier. Assavoir, un traicté general de la pharmacie. Ensemble un docte commmentaire sur les quatre theoremes & canons de Mesue. Avec deux excellens traictez, l’un des simples medicaments purgatifs, & l’autre des venins. Le tout accompagné de disputes, où sont debatuës, & esclaircies plusieurs questions curieuses, & necessaires pour la parfaite intelligence de ces matieres. Avec privilege de sa majesté. Ed. by Henri Gras. A Lyon: Chez Pierre Ravaud, en ruë Merciere, à l’enseigne S. Pierre, M.DC.XXVIII [1628].

Ray, John. A collection of English proverbs. Digested into a convenient method for the speedy finding any one upon occasion; with short annotations. Whereunto are added local proverbs with their explications, old proverbial rhythmes, less known or exotick proverbial sentences; and scottish proverbs. Cambridge: Printed by John Hayes, Printer to the University, for W. Morden, 1670.

Ray, John. A collection of English proverbs. Digested into a convenient method for the speedy finding any one upon occasion; with short annotations. Whereunto are added local proverbs with their explications, old proverbial rhythmes, less known or exotick proverbial sentences; and scottish proverbs. The second edition, enlarged by the addition of many hundred English, and an appendix of Hebrew proverbs, with annotations and parallels. Cambridge: Printed by John Hayes, Printer to the University, for W. Morden, 1678.

Ray, John. Miscellaneous discourses concerning the dissolution and changes of the world. Wherein the primitive chaos and creation, the general deluge, fountains, formed stones, sea-shells found in the earth, subterraneous trees, mountains, earthquakes, vulcanoes, the universal conflagration and future state, are largely discussed and examined. By John Ray, Fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed for Samuel Smith, at the Prince’s Arms in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, 1692.

Rich, Richard. [Newes from Virginia.] The lost flocke triumphant. With the happy arrivall of that famous and worthy knight Sr. Thomas Gates: and the well reputed & valiant captaine Mr. Christopher Newporte, and others, into England. With the maner of their distresse in the Iland of Devils (otherwise called Bermoothawes) where they remayned 42. weekes, & builded two pynaces, in which they returned into Virginia. By R. Rich, gent. one of the voyage. London: Printed by Edw: Allde, and are to be solde by Iohn Wright at Christ-Church dore, 1610.

Riolan, Jean, and Nicholas Culpeper, trans., rev. by W. R. A sure guide; or, The best and nearest way to physick and chyrurgery: that is to say, the arts of healing by medicine, and manual operation. Being an anatomical description of the whole body of man, and its parts, with their respective diseases, demonstrated from the fabrick and use of the said parts. In six books. Viz. 1. Describing all, and every of the bones of mans body, according to the antient method. 2. Describing the belly, and all its parts and bowels, with their respective diseases. 3. Describing the chest and all its parts and contents, with their respective diseases. 4. Describing the head, and face, with all their parts containing and contained, and their respective diseases. [5]. Describing the limbs of the body, with the many regiments of muscles, and their diseases. [6]. Containing a new description of the bones, by a method first invented by our author, handling al the diseases and symptomes of the said bones. At the end of these six books, are added twenty four tables, cut in brass, containing one hundred eighty four figures, with an explanation of them; all which are referred to in above a thousand places in the books, for the help of yong artists. Written in Latin, by Johannes Riolanus, Junior; Doctor of physick, Physitian in ordinary to the Queen Mother of France many years together, and the last she had: and also the King’s Professor of Anatomy and Herbarism, in the University of Paris. The third edition, corrected and amended. Englished by Nicholas Culpeper, gent. and W. R., Doctor of the Liberal Arts and of physick. London: Printed by John Streater, and are to be sold by George Sawbridge, at the sign of the Bible on Ludgate-Hill, MDCLXXI [1671].

Robison, John, ed. Lectures on the elements of chemistry, delivered in the University of Edinburgh; by the late Joseph Black, M.D. professor of chemistry in that university, physician to His Majesty for Scotland, member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, of the Royal Academy of Sciences at Paris, and the Imperial Academy of Sciences at St. Petersburgh. Published from his manuscripts by John Robison, LLD. professor of natural philosophy in the University of Edinburgh. First American from the last London edition. Vol. I. Edinburgh, 1803. Rpt. Philadelphia: Printed for Mathew Carey, No. 122, Market Street. Sold by Birch & Small, S. F. Bradford, and Jacob Johnson, Philadelphia; Brisban & Brannan, Thomson & Hart, and T. & J. Swords, New York; Beers and Howe, New-Haven; Etheridge & Bliss, and Thomas & Andrews, Boston. 1807.

[Rochefort, Charles de, et al.] Histoire naturelle et morale des iles Antilles de l’Amerique. Enrichie de plusieurs belles figures des raretez les plus considerables qui y sont d’écrites. Avec un vocabulaire caraibe. A Roterdam: Chez Arnould Leers, M. DC. LVIII [1658].

Rochefort, Charles de, et al., and John Davies, trans. The history of Barbados, St Christophers, Mevis, St Vincents, Antego, Martinico, Monserrat, and the rest of the Caribby-Islands, in all XXVIII. In two books. The first containing the natural; the second, the moral history of those islands. Illustrated with several pieces of sculpture, representing the most considerable rarities therein described. Englished by J. Davies of Kidwelly. London: Printed for John Starkey and Thomas Dring junr, at the Mitre between the Middle Temple-Gate and Temple-Bar, and at the White Lion neer Chancery-Lane end in Fleet-street, 1666.

Rooke, Lawrence, and Henry Oldenburg, ed. “Directions for sea-men, bound for far voyages.” Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London 1.8 (Jan. 1665–6): 140–143.

A complete digital transcription of Rooke’s list of directions for seamen is available as a She-philosopher.com 2nd-window aside for the editor’s introductory essay on Richard Flecknoe’s mid-17th-century journey to Brazil (Lib. Cat. No. FLECK1656). You can link to it from there.

Rosier, James. A true relation of the most prosperous voyage made this present yeere 1605, by Captaine George Waymouth, in the discovery of the land of Virginia: where he discovered 60 miles up a most excellent riuer; together with a most fertile land. Written by James Rosier. a gentleman employed in the voyage. Londini: [Printed at Eliot’s Court Press] impensis Geor. Bishop, 1605.

Ross, Alexander. “The Camelions food is onely aire” and “The Camelion lives on aire onely.” In Arcana microcosmi: or, The hid secrets of mans body disclosed; first, in an anatomical duel between Aristotle & Galen, about the parts thereof. Secondly, by a discovery of the strange and marvellous diseases, symptomes, and accidents of mans body. With a refutation of Doctor Browns Vulgar errors, and the ancient opinions vindicated. By Alexander Ross. London: Printed by Thomas Newcomb, and are to be sold by George Latham at the Bishops Head in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1651. 197–201, 201–203.

An HTML transcription of Alexander Ross’s two essays on the chameleon is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. ROSS1651.

Rowland, John, M.D., trans. The theater of insects: or, lesser living creatures. As, bees flies, caterpillars, spidrs [sic], worms, &c. a most elaborate work. By Tho. Mouffet, doctor in physick. Vol. 2 of The history of four-footed beasts and serpents: describing at large their true and lively figure, their several names, conditions, kinds, virtues (both natural and medicinal) countries of their breed, their love and hatred to mankind, and the wonderful work of God in their creation, preservation, and destruction. Interwoven with curious variety of historical narrations out of Scriptures, fathers, philosophers, physicians, and poets: illustrated with divers hieroglyphicks and emblems, &c. both pleasant and profitable for students in all faculties and professions. Collected out of the writings of Conradus Gesner and other authors, by Edward Topsell. Whereunto is now added, The theater of insects, or, lesser living creatures: as bees, flies, caterpillars, spiders, worms, &c. A most elaborate work: by T. Muffet, Dr. of physick. The whole revised, corrected and inlarged, with the addition of two useful physical tables by J. R.[,] M.D. London: Printed by E. Cotes for G. Sawbridge at the Bible on Ludgate-Hill, T. Williams at the Bible in Little-Britain, and T. Johnson at the Key in Pauls Church yard, MDCLVIII [1658].

Royal Society of London. Bk. rev. “An account of a book. Lexicon technicum: or, an universal English dictionary of arts and sciences, explaining not only the terms of art, but the arts themselves by J. Harris, M.A. and F.R.S.” By Hans Sloane, S.R.S. and editor. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London 24.292 (1704): 1699–1702.

Royal Society of London. Bk. rev. “An account of books. Diogenes Laertius Graece & Latine, cum commentariis integris Doctorum Virorum Amstelodami. Typis Henrici Wetstenii, Anno 1692. Prostant Londini apud S. Smith & B. Walford ad insignia principis in Coemeterio D. Pauli.” By Richard Waller, S.R.S. and editor. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London 17.203 (Sept. 1693): 886–888.

Salmon, William. The family-dictionary; or, Houshold companion: containing, in an alphabetical method, I. Directions for cookery, in dressing flesh, fowl, fish, herbs, roots, &c. Seasoning, making sauces, bills of fare, art of carving, &c. II. Making all sorts of pastry ware, and things made of meal, flower, whether bak’d, boyled, or fried, &c. III. Making of conserves, candies, preserves, confects, lozenges, gellies, creams, pickles, &c. IV. The making all kinds of potable liquors, as ales, meads, metheglin, English wines of cherries, currants, gooseberries, raspberries, &c. Cyder, cyder-royal, usquebaugh, cordial waters. V. The making of all sorts of rare perfumes, sweet balls, pouders, admirable washes, beatifying waters, oils, essences, pomatums. VI. The virtues and uses of the most usual herbs and plants, their roots, barks, leaves, flowers, fruits, seeds, used in physick. VII. The preparations of several choice medicines, physical, and chirurgical, as cordial waters, spirits, tinctures, elixirs, essences, syrups, pouders, electuaries, pills, oils, ointments, cerecloths, and emplasters. Fitted for a family use, in curing most diseases incident to men, women, and children. The second edition, corrected and much enlarged. By William Salmon, professor of physick. London: printed for H. Rhodes, at the Star, the corner of Bride-lane, in Fleet-street: and sold by R. Clavel at the Peacock against St. Dunstan’s Church in Fleetstreet, 1696.

Sandys, George, trans. Ovid’s Metamorphosis Englished by G. S. Imprinted at London: [By William Stansby], MDCXXVI [1626].

Sappho of Lesbos. Sappho: a garland. The poems & fragments of Sappho. Trans. and introd. by Jim Powell. New York: Farrar Straus Girous, 1993.

Savile, George (Lord Halifax). The lady’s New-years gift, or, Advice to a daughter under these following heads: viz. religion, husband, house and family, servants, behaviour and conversation, friendship, censure, vanity and affectation, pride, diversion, dancing. London: Printed for Matt. Gillyflower, and James Partridge, 1688.

Savile, Henry, Sir. Tou en hagiois patros hemon Ioannou Archiepiskopou Konstantinoupoleos tou Chrysostomou ton heuriskomenon tomos protos [-ogdoos], di epimeleias k[a]i analomaton Herrikou tou Sabiliou en palaion antigraphon ekdotheis. 8 vols. Etonæ: in Collegio Regali, excudebat Joannes Norton, in Græcis &c. regius typographus, 1612 [i.e. 1611–1613].

The title of this 8-volume work, printed in Greek, is in Greek characters.
   Sir Henry Savile’s Greek edition of Chrysostom is also known as S. Joannis Chrysostomi Opera Græcé or Greek Works of Chrysostomus (from the additional, engraved title-page to vol. 1, dated 1613, and signed: “Leonardus Gaultier sculpsit”).

Schurman, Anna Maria van. The learned maid; or, Whether a maid may be a scholar? A logick exercise written in Latine by that incomparable virgin Anna Maria à Schurman of Utrecht. With some epistles to the famous Gassendus and others. London: Printed by John Redmayne, 1659.

Schurman, Anna Maria van. Whether a Christian woman should be educated and other writings from her intellectual circle. Ed. and trans. by Joyce L. Irwin. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1998.

Scot, George, ed. The memoires of Sir James Melvil of Hal-hill: containing an impartial account of the most remarkable affairs of state during the last age, not mention’d by other historians: more particularly relating to the kingdoms of England and Scotland, under the reigns of Queen Elizabeth, Mary Queen of Scots, and King James. In all which transactions the author was personally and publickly concern’d. Now published from the original manuscript. By George Scott, gent. London: Printed by E. H. for Robert Boulter at the Turks-head in Corn-hill, against the Royal-Exchange, 1683.

Scott, George Lewis, et al. A supplement to Mr. Chambers’s Cyclopædia: or, universal dictionary of arts and sciences. In two volumes. 2 vols. London: Printed for W. Innys and J. Richardson, R. Ware, J. and P. Knapton, T. Osborne, S. Birt, T. and T. Longman, D. Browne, C. Hitch and L. Hawes, J. Hodges, J. Shuckburgh, A. Millar, J. and J. Rivington, J. Ward, M. Senex, and the Executors of J. Darby, MDCCLIII [1753].

A complete digital edition of Scott’s 2-volume Supplement to Chambers’ 2-volume Cyclopaedia is available online, as part of the History of Science project, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections Center.

Seller, John. Atlas maritimus. Or a book of charts. Describeing the sea coasts capes headlands sands shoals rocks and dangers. The bayes roads harbors rivers and ports. In most of the knowne parts of the world. With the true courses and distances, from one place to another. Gathered from the latest and best discoveryes, that have bin made by divers able and experienced navigators of our English nation. Accomodated with an hydrographicall description of the whole world. By John Seller. Hidrographer to ye Kings most excellent Majestie. Cum privilegio. [London]: And are to be sold by him, at the Hermitage Staires in Wapping, and at his shop in the Exchange Alley near the Royall Exchange in London, [1672?].

Seller, John. The coasting pilot: Describing the sea-coasts, channels, soundings, sands, shoals, rocks, & dangers: the bayes, roads, harbours, rivers, ports, buoyes, beacons, and sea-marks, upon the coasts of England Flanders and Holland with directions to bring a shipp into any harbour on the said coasts. Being furnished with the new draughts, charts, and descriptions, gathered from ye experience and practise of diverse able and expert navigators of our English nation. Collected and published by John Seller. Hydrographer in ordinary to the King. Cum privilegio. [London]: And are to be sold at his shopps at the hermitage in Wapping: and in Exchange-Alley in Corne-Hill. And by W. Fisher at the Posterne on Towerhill. And by Jo. Wingfield in Crutched Fryars right against the Church, [1671?].

Seller, John. The English pilot: describing the sea-coasts, capes, head-lands, soundings, sands, shoals, rocks and dangers; the bayes, roads, harbors, rivers and ports in the northern and southern navigation[.] Shewing the courses and distances from one place to another, the setting of tydes and currents; the ebbing and flowing of the sea and many other necessary things belonging to the practical part of navigation. Being furnished with new and exact draughts, charts, and descriptions: gathered from the latest and best discoveries that have been made by divers able and expert navigators of our English nation[.] Collected for the general use of our countrymen, by John Seller, hydrographer to the King. Cum privilegio. [London]: And are to be sold by the author at the sign of the Marriners Compass, at the Hermitage-stairs in Wapping, [1671–2].

Sepibus, Georgius de. Romani Collegii Societatus Jesu Musaeum celeberrimum, cuius magnum antiquariae rei, statuarum imaginum, picturarumque partem. Ex legato Alphonsi Domini, S.P.Q.R. a secretis, munificâ liberalitate relictum. P. Athanasius Kircherus Soc. Jesu, novis & raris inventis locupletatum, compluriumque principum curiosis donariis magno rerum apparatu instruxit; innumeris insuper rebus ditatum, ad plurimorum, maxime exterorum, curiositatisque doctrinae avidorum instantiam urgentesque preces novis compluribusque machinis, tum peregrinis ex Indiis allatis rebus publicae luci votisque exponit Georgius de Sepibus. Amstelodami: Ex Officina Janssonio-Waesbergiana Anno MDCLXXVIII [1678].

Settle, Elkanah. The new Athenian comedy: containing the politicks, oeconomicks, tacticks, crypticks, apocalypticks, stypticks, scepticks, pneumaticks, theologicks, poeticks, mathematicks, sophisticks, pragmaticks, dogmaticks, &c. of that most learned society. London: Printed for Campanella Restio, next door to the Apollo, near the Temple, 1693.

Shakespeare, William. The tragicall historie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke. By William Shakespeare. Newly imprinted and enlarged to almost as much againe as it was, according to the true and perfect coppie. At London: Printed by J. R. for N. L. and are to be sold at his shoppe under Saint Dunstons Church in Fleetstreet, 1604.

Shakespeare, William. The two gentlemen of Verona. By Mr. William Shakespear. London: printed for J. Tonson, and the rest of the proprietors; and sold by the booksellers of London and Westminster, MDCCXXXIV [1734].

Smith, John. An accidence or The path-way to experience. Necessary for all young sea-men, or those that are desirous to goe to sea, briefly shewing the phrases, offices, and words of command, belonging to the building, ridging, and sayling, a man of warre; and how to manage a fight at sea. Together with the charge and duty of every officer, and their shares: also the names, weight, charge, shot, and powder, of all sorts of great ordnance. With the use of the petty tally. Written by Captaine John Smith sometimes governour of Virginia, and admirall of New England. London: Printed for Jonas Man, and Benjamin Fisher, and are to be sold at the signe of the Talbot, in Aldersgate streete, 1626.

Smith, John. Advertisements for the unexperienced planters of New-England, or any where. Or, The path-way to experience to erect a plantation. With the yearely proceedings of this country in fishing and planting, since the yeare 1614. to the yeare 1630. and their present estate. Also how to prevent the greatest inconveniences, by their proceedings in Virginia, and other plantations, by approved examples. With the countries armes, a description of the coast, harbours, habitations, land-markes, latitude and longitude: with the map, allowed by our royall King Charles. By Captaine John Smith, sometimes governour of Virginia, and admirall of New-England. London: Printed by John Haviland, and are to be sold by Robert Milbourne, at the Grey-hound in Pauls Church-yard, 1631.

Smith, John. Capt. John Smith: of Willoughby by Alford, Lincolnshire; president of Virginia, and admiral of New England. Works. l608-1631. 2 vols. Ed. by Edward Arber. The English scholar’s library of old and modern works (vols. 4–5), no. 16. 1884; rpt. Westminster: Archibald Constable and Co., 1895.

Smith, John. A description of New England: or The observations, and discoveries, of Captain John Smith (admirall of that country) in the north of America, in the year of our Lord 1614: with the successe of sixe ships, that went the next yeare 1615; and the accidents befell him among the French men of warre. With the proofe of the present benefit this countrey affoords: whither this present yeare, 1616, eight voluntary ships are gone to make further tryall. At London: Printed by Humfrey Lownes, for Robert Clerke; and are to be sould at his house called the Lodge, in Chancery lane, over against Lincolnes Inne, 1616.

Smith, John. The generall historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles: with the names of the adventurers, planters, and governours from their first beginning An:1584 to this present 1624. With the procedings of those severall colonies and the accidents that befell them in all their journyes and discoveries. Also the maps and descriptions of all those countryes, their commodities, people, government, customes, and religion yet knowne. Divided into sixe bookes. By Captaine John Smith sometymes governour in those countryes & Admirall of New England. London: Printed by I. D. and I. H. for Michael Sparkes, 1624.

Smith, John. A sea grammar, with the plaine exposition of Smiths Accidence for young sea-men, enlarged. Divided into fifteene chapters: what they are you may partly conceive by the contents. Written by Captaine John Smith, sometimes governour of Virginia, and admirall of New-England. London: Printed by John Haviland, 1627.

Smith, John. The sea-mans grammar: containing most plain and easie directions, how to build, rigge, yard, and mast any ship whatsoever. With the plain exposition of all such terms as are used in a navie and fight at sea. Whereunto is added a table of the weight, charge, shot, powder, and the dimensions of all other appurtenances belonging to all sorts of great ordnance. With divers practicall experiments in the art of gunnery. Also the charge and duty of every officer in a ship and their shares: with the use of the petty tally. Written by Captain John Smith, sometimes governour of Virginia, and admiral of New England. Imprinted at London: And are to be sold by Andrew Kemb, at St. Margarets Hill in Southwark, 1653 [1652].

Smith, John. A true relation of such occurrences and accidents of noate as hath hapned in Virginia since the first planting of that collony, which is now resident in the south part thereof, till the last returne from thence. Written by Captaine Smith one of the said collony, to a worshipfull friend of his in England. London: Printed for Iohn Tappe, and are to bee solde at the Greyhound in Paules-Church-yard, by W. W., 1608.

Smith, John. The true travels, adventures, and observations of Captaine John Smith, in Europe, Asia, Affrica, and America, from anno Domini 1593. to 1629. His accidents and sea-fights in the Straights; his service and stratagems of warre in Hungaria, Transilvania, Wallachia, and Moldavia, against the Turks, and Tartars; his three single combats betwixt the Christian armie and the Turkes. After how he was taken prisoner by the Turks, sold for a slave, sent into Tartaria; his description of the Tartars, their strange manners and customes of religions, diets, buildings, warres, feasts, ceremonies, and living; how hee slew the Bashaw of Nalbrits in Cambia, and escaped from the Turkes and Tartars. Together with a continuation of his generall History of Virginia, Summer-Iles, New England, and their proceedings, since 1624. to this present 1629; as also of the new plantations of the great river of the Amazons, the iles of St. Christopher, Mevis, and Barbados in the West Indies. All written by actuall authours, whose names you shall finde along the history. London: Printed by J. H. for Thomas Slater, and are to bee sold at the Blew Bible in Greene Arbour, 1630.

Sprat, Thomas. The history of the Royal-Society of London for the improving of natural knowledge. London: Printed by T. R. for J. Martyn at the Bell without Temple-bar, and J. Allestry at the Rose and Crown in Duck-lane, Printers to the Royal Society. MDCLXVII [1667].

Sprengell, C. J. The aphorisms of Hippocrates, and the sentences of Celsus; with explanations and references to the most considerable writers in physick and philosophy, both ancient and modern. To which are added, aphorisms upon the small-pox, measles, and other distempers, not so well known to former more temperate ages. By C. J. Sprengell, M.D. London: printed for R. Bonwick, W. Freeman, Tim. Goodwin, John Waltho [sic], Matt. Wotton, John Nicholson, Samuel Manship, Richard Parker, Benj. Tooke and Ralph Smith, 1708.

Stanley, Thomas. The Chaldaick oracles of Zoroaster and his followers. With the expositions of Pletho and Psellus. London: Printed for Thomas Dring, 1661.

This title was also bound in with vol. 4 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy. The eighth part, containing the Stoick philosophers. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and Tho: Dring, An. Dom. 1656.

This title was also bound in with vol. 2 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy. The fift part. Containing the Academick philosophers. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and Tho. Dring, An. Dom. 1656.

This title was also bound in with vol. 2 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy, the fifth part: containing the Epicurean sect. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley and Thomas Dring, anno 1659.

This title was also bound in with vol. 3 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy, the first part, containing the Italick sect. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley and Thomas Dring, Anno Dom. 1660.

This title was also bound in with vol. 3 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy. The first volume. By Thomas Stanley. Containing those on whom the attribute of wise was conferred. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and Thomas Dring, and are to be sold at their shops at the Princes Armes in St. Pauls Church-yard, and at the George in Fleetstreet neere Cliffords Inne, 1655.

The 1st volume of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy, featuring detailed accounts of the philosophical doctrines of Thales, Solon, and Socrates.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy. The fourth part. Containing the Cyrenaick, Megarick, Eleack, Eretriack sects. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and Thomas Dring, An. Dom. 1656.

This title was also bound in with vol. 2 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy, the fourth part: containing the Sceptick sect. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley and Thomas Dring, anno 1659.

This title was also bound in with vol. 3 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy, the second part: containing the Heraclitian sect. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley and Thomas Dring, anno 1659.

This title was also bound in with vol. 3 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy. The second part. Containing the Ionick philosophers. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and are to be sold at his shop at the Princes Armes in St. Pauls Church-yard, and by Thomas Dring, at the George in Fleetstreet neere Cliffords Inne, 1655.

This title was also bound in with vol. 1 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy, the second volume. By Tho. Stanley. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and Thomas Dring; and are to be sold at the Princes Armes in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, and at the George in Fleet-street neere Cliffords-Inne, 1656.

The 2nd volume of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy, featuring detailed accounts of the philosophical doctrines of Plato, Aristotle, and Stoicism.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy. The seventh part, containing the Cynick philosophers. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and Thomas Dring, An. Dom. 1656.

This title was also bound in with vol. 2 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy. The sixt part, containing the Peripatetick philosophers. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and Tho: Dring, An. Dom. 1656.

This title was also bound in with vol. 2 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy, the third and last volume, in five parts. By Thomas Stanley. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley and Thomas Dring, and are to be sold at their shops at the Prince’s Armes in S. Pauls Church-yard, and at the George in Fleet-street, near S. Dunstons Church, 1660.

The 3rd volume of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy, featuring detailed accounts of the philosophical doctrines of Pythagoras and the pre-Socratics, Scepticism, and Epicureanism.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy, the third part: containing the Eleatick sect. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley and Thomas Dring, anno 1659.

This title was also bound in with vol. 3 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of philosophy. The third part. Containing the Socratic philosophers. London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and Thomas Dring, and are to be sold at their shops at the Princes Armes in St. Pauls Church-yard, and at the George in Fleetstreet neere Cliffords Inne, 1655.

This title was also bound in with vol. 1 of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy.

Stanley, Thomas. The history of the Chaldaick philosophy. By Thomas Stanley. London: Printed for Thomas Dring, and are to be sold at his shop at the George in Fleet-street neer Cliffords-Inn, anno 1662.

The 4th volume of Stanley’s authoritative History of Philosophy, presumably added as an afterthought (cf. the title-page to vol. 3, printed 2 years earlier in 1660, advertising it as the “last volume” in the series). Describes the occult learning of ancient Egypt, Babylonia, and Persia.

Strachey, William. The historie of travell into Virginia Britania. The Percy Ms., c.1612. Transcribed and edited by Louis B. Wright and Virginia Freund. Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, 2nd ser., no. 103. London: Hakluyt Society, 1953.

Stubbe, Henry. An account of the rise and progress of Mahometanism with the life of Mahomet and a vindication of him and his religion from the calumnies of the Christians. In An account of the rise and progress of Mahometanism with the life of Mahomet and a vindication of him and his religion from the calumnies of the Christians. From a manuscript copied by Charles Hornby of Pipe Office, in 1705, with some variations and additions. Ed. by Mahmud Khan Shairani. London: Luzac, 1911.

Stubbe, Henry. Campanella revived. Or an enquiry into the history of the Royal Society, whether the virtuosi there do not pursue the projects of Campanella for the reducing England unto Popery. Being the extract of a letter to a person of honour from H. S. with another letter to Sir N. N. relating the cause of the quarrel betwixt H. S. and the R. S. and an apology against some of their cavils. With a postscript concerning the quarrel depending betwixt H. S. and Dr. Merrett. London: Printed for the author, 1670.

Stubbe, Henry. A censure upon certaine passages contained in the history of the Royal Society, as being destructive to the established religion and Church of England. Oxford: Printed for Ric. Davis, A.D. 1670.

Stubbe, Henry. Legends no histories: or, A specimen of some animadversions upon The history of the Royal Society. Wherein, besides the several errors against common literature, sundry mistakes about the making of salt-petre and gun-powder are detected, and rectified: whereunto are added two discourses, one of Pietro Sardi, and another of Nicolas Tartaglia relating to that subject. Translated out of Italian. With a brief account of those passages of the authors life, which the virtuosi intended most to censure, and expatiate upon: written to save them the trouble of doing any thing besides defending themselves. Together with the Plus ultra of Mr. Joseph Glanvill reduced to a non-plus, &c. By Henry Stubbe, physician at Warwick. Printed at London: [for N. H.], [1670].

Stubbe, Henry. The Plus ultra reduced to a non plus: or, a specimen of some animadversions upon the Plus ultra of Mr. Glanvill, wherein sundry errors of some virtuosi are discovered, the credit of the Aristotelians in part re-advanced; and enquiries made about the advantages of the ancient education in England above the novel and mchanical. The old peripatetick notion of the gravity of the air, and the pressure of the aereal columne or cylinder. The deceitfulness of telescopes. The world in the moon, and a voyage thither. The original and progress of chymistry. The use of chymical medicaments. The usefulness of the peripatetick philosophy in reference to the practice of physick. The original and progress of anatomy. The first inventor of the circulation of the blood. The transfusion of blood, the first proposers and inventors thereof, and its usefulness. The different nature of the blood, and the variety of phaenomena appearing upon the burning thereof, and mixing of it with several liquors. Some trials in order to a discovery of the nature of the English baths. By Henry Stubbe, physician at Warwick. London: printed for the author, 1670.

Stubbe, Henry. A reply unto the letter written to Mr. Henry Stubbe in defense of The history of the Royal Society. Whereunto is added a preface against Ecebolius Glanvill; and an answer to the letter of Dr. Henry More, containing a reply to the untruthes he hath publish’d, and a censure of the cabbalo-pythagorical philosophy, by him promoted. Oxford: Printed for Richard Davis, 1671.

Tate, Nahum. A present for the ladies: being an historical vindication of the female sex. To which is added, the character of an accomplish’d virgin, wife, and widow, in verse. London: Printed for Francis Saunders, at the Blue Anchor in the New Exchange in the Strand, 1692.

Tempest, Pierce, and Isaac Fuller, illust. Iconologia: or, moral emblems, by Caesar Ripa. Wherein are express’d, various images of virtues, vices, passions, arts, humours, elements and celestial bodies; as design’d by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and modern Italians. Useful for orators, poets, painters, sculptors, and all lovers of ingenuity. Illustrated with three hundred twenty-six humane figures, with their explanations. Newly design’d, and engraven on copper, by I. Fuller, painter, and other masters. By the care and at the charge of P. Tempest. London: Printed by Benj. Motte, MDCCIX [1709].

Thévenot, Jean de. The travels of Monsieur de Thevenot into the Levant. In three parts. Viz. into I. Turkey. II. Persia. III. The East-Indies. Newly done out of French. Licensed, Decemb. 2. 1686. Ro. L’Estrange. Trans. Archibald Lovell. London: Printed by H. Clark, for H. Faithorne, J. Adamson, C. Skegnes, and T. Newborough, booksellers in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, MDCLXXXVII [1687].

Thornton, Alice. MSS., diary and letters in 4 vols., for 1629–1707. The autobiography of Mrs Alice Thornton. Ed. by Charles Jackson. Surtees Society, vol. 62. Durham: pub. for the Surtees Society by Andrews and Co., 1875.

Tomlinson, Richard, trans. A medicinal dispensatory, containing the whole body of physick: discovering the natures, properties, and vertues of vegetables, minerals, & animals: the manner of compounding medicaments, and the way to administer them. Methodically digested in five books of philosophical and pharmaceutical institutions; three books of physical materials galenical and chymical. Together with a most perfect and absolute pharmacopoea or apothecaries shop. Accommodated with three useful tables. Composed by the illustrious Renodæus, chief physician to the monarch of France; and now Englished and revised, by Richard Tomlinson of London, apothecary. London: Printed by Jo: Streater and Ja: Cottrel; and are to be sold by Henry Fletcher at the three gilt Cups neer the west-end of Pauls, 1657.

Topsell, Edward. The historie of foure-footed beastes. Describing the true and lively figure of every beast, with a discourse of their severall names, conditions, kindes, vertues (both naturall and medicinall) countries of their breed, their love and hate to mankinde, and the wonderfull worke of God in their creation, preservation, and destruction. Necessary for all divines and students, because the story of every beast is amplified with narrations out of scriptures, fathers, phylosophers, physitians, and poets: wherein are declared divers hyerogliphicks, emblems, epigrams, and other good histories, collected out of all the volumes of Conradus Gesner, and all other writers to this present day. By Edward Topsell. London: Printed by William Jaggard, 1607.

Topsell, Edward. The historie of serpents. Or, The second booke of living creatures: wherein is contained their divine, naturall, and morall descriptions, with their lively figures, names, conditions, kindes and natures of all venemous beasts: with their severall poysons and antidotes; their deepe hatred to mankind, and the wonderfull worke of God in their creation, and destruction. Necessary and profitable to all sortes of men: collected out of divine scriptures, fathers, phylosophers, physitians, and poets: amplified with sundry accidentall histories, hierogliphicks, epigrams, emblems, and aenigmaticall observations. By Edward Topsell. London: Printed by William Jaggard, 1608.

Tradescant, John, Jr. Musæum Tradescantianum: or, a collection of rarities. Preserved at South-Lambeth neer London by John Tradescant. London: Printed by John Grismond, and are to be sold by Nathanael Brooke at the Angel in Cornhill, MDCLVI [1656].

Trye, Mary. Medicatrix, or the woman-physician: vindicating Thomas O Dowde, a chymical physician, and royal licentiate; and chymistry; against the calumnies and abusive reflections of Henry Stubbe a physician at Warwick. Stubbe in nomination with Cicero. A recital of some publications Mr. Stubbe makes in his own life. His malice against ingenious scrutinies, and the advantage thereof. The life of Mr. O Dowde: his promotion of the chymical society: his noble acquirements in medicine: his practice in the last great plague, and dea[t]h therein. The second part. The authors opinion of learning; the abuse of the same, Mr. Stubb’s projects and design, only his interest, not the benefit of the sick. Phlebotomy he so much commends in the small pox, pleurisie, scurvy, fevers, &c. condemned and rejected. A medicinal challenge to Mr. Stubbe, proffering by experiment to confute his avow in phlebotomy. And to cure by chymical medicines, the gout, stone, agues, dropsies, falling-sickness, consumptions, griping of the guts, veneral lues or il mal Francese, &c. and those diseases, which by his generous medicaments and lancet he cannot. A revival of Mr. O Dowd’s medicines; and other chymical remedies, with an advertisement thereof. Written by M. Trye the daughter of O Dowde. Avec tout ton scavoir cognois toy mesme. ---For the life of all flesh is the blood thereof, Lev. 18. 14. London: Printed by T. R. & N. T. and sold by Henry Broome, at the Gun at the west end of St. Pauls, and John Leete at Chancery-lane end next Fleet-street, 1675.

Trye, Mary. Selections from Medicatrix, or the woman-physician (pp. 55–60, 113–115). London, 1675. Rpt. in English women’s voices, 1540–1700. Ed. by Charlotte F. Otten. Miami: Florida International University Press, 1992. 193–196.

Tryon, Thomas. [Averroeana.] Being a transcript of several letters from Averroes an Arabian philosopher at Corduba in Spain, to Metrodorus a young Grecian nobleman, student at Athens, in the years 1149, and 1150. Also several letters from Pythagoras to the King of India, together with his reception at the Indian court, and an account of his discourse with the King, and his gymnosophists, and his rules and precepts: his account of the power and efficacy of numbers, and magical uses thereof. To which is prefixt, a Latin letter by Monsieur Grinau, one of the Messieurs du Port Royal in France, to the ingenius Monsieur Gramont, merchant at Amsterdam, concerning the subject of these papers, and how they came to his hands. The whole containing matters highly philosophical, physiological, Pythagorical and medicinal. The work having been long conceal’d, is now put into English for the benefit of mankind, and the rectification of learned mistakes. London: Printed and sold by T. Sowle, in White-Hart-Court in Grace-Church-Street, 1695.

Tryon, Thomas. A dialogue between an East-Indian brackmanny or heathen-philosopher, and a French gentleman concerning the present affairs of Europe. London: Printed and sold by Andrew Sowle at the Crooked-Billet in Holloway-Lane, in Shoreditch, 1683.

Tryon, Thomas. The planter’s speech to his neighbours & country-men of Pennsylvania, East & West-Jersey, and to all such as have transported themselves into new-colonies for the sake of a quiet retired life. To which is added, the complaints of our supra-inferior-inhabitants. London: Printed and sold by Andrew Sowle in Shoreditch, 1684.

A digital reissue (2014) of Thomas Tryon’s The Planter’s Speech to his Neighbours & Country-Men of Pennsylvania, East & West-Jersey ... (1684), ed. by Deborah Taylor-Pearce, is available in the Roses​.Communicating​By​Design​.com Historical Section.

Tryon, Thomas. Pythagoras his mystick philosophy reviv’d; or, The mystery of dreams unfolded. Wherein the causes, natures, and uses, of nocturnal representations, and the communications both of good and evil angels, and also departed souls, to mankind, are theosophically unfolded; that is, according to the word of god, and the harmony of created beings. Night unto night sheweth wisdom, Psal. 19. 2. To which is added, a discourse of the causes, natures, and cure of phrensie, madness or distraction. By Tho. Tryon, student in physick, and author of The way to long life, health, and happiness. London: Printed for Tho. Salusbury, at the sign of the Temple near Temple-Bar in Fleet-Street, 1691.

[Tryon, Thomas, and Thomas Lupton]. The way to get wealth: or, a new and easie way to make twenty three sorts of wine, equal to that of France; with their vertues. Also to make cyder, mead, rum, rack, brandy, and cordial waters: pickles, vinegar, and the mystery of vintners. Also, divers physical receipts to help a bad memory, so that you may remember all that you read or do. To make cloaths keep out rain. The compleat servant-maid, directing to dress fish, flesh, or fowl. To have a fresh crop of corn. To make China-varnish, and black ground for Japan-Work, to black wood, and gild. To which is added, a help to discourse, giving an account of trade of all countries, and inventers of arts and sciences. An account of the river Nilus. To make horses fat. Of gardning, and many other curiosities. By the author of The way to save wealth; and of One thousand notable things. London: printed for G. Conyers, at the Golden Ring, [1701?].

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Verstegan, Richard, trans. Amorum emblemata, figuris æneis incisa studio Othonis Væni Batavo-Lugdunensis. Emblemes of love. With verses in Latin, English, and Italian. By Otto van Veen. Antuerpiæ: [Typis Henrici Swingenij.] Venalia apud auctorem, M.DC.IIX [1608].

Waghenaer, Lucas Janszoon. The mariners mirrour wherin may playnly be seen the courses, heights, distances, depths, soundings, flouds and ebs, risings of lands, rocks, sands and shoalds, with the marks for th’entrings of the harbouroughs, havens and ports of the greatest part of Europe: their several traficks and commodities: together wth. the rules and instrume[n]ts of navigation. First made & set fourth in divers exact sea-charts, by that famous navigator Luke Wagenar of Enchuisen and now fitted with necessarie additions for the use of Englishmen by Anthony Ashley. Heerin also may be understood the exploits lately atchived by the right Honorable the L. Admiral of Engla[n]d with her Maties. navie and some former services don by that worthy knight Sr. Fra: Drake. [London: Printed by John Charlewood, 1588].

Waller, Richard, and William Derham, ed. “Concerning the burning-glasses of the ancients, from the history of the Academie Royale des Sciences, for the year 1708. With some remarks.” In Philosophical experiments and observations of the late eminent Dr. Robert Hooke, S.R.S. and geom. prof. Gresh. and other eminent virtuoso’s in his time. With copper plates. Publish’d by W. Derham, F.R.S. London: Printed by W. and J. Innys, printers to the Royal Society, at the west end of St. Paul’s, MDCCXXVI [1726]. 348–61.

Waller, Richard, trans. Essayes of natural experiments made in the Academie del Cimento, under the protection of the Most Serene Prince Leopold of Tuscany. Written in Italian by the secretary of that academy. Englished by Richard Waller, Fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed for Benjamin Alsop at the Angel and Bible in the Poultrey, over-against the Church, 1684.

Waller, Richard. “The life of Dr. Robert Hooke.” In The posthumous works of Robert Hooke, M.D. S.R.S. Geom. Prof. Gresh. &c. containing his Cutlerian lectures, and other discourses, read at the meetings of the illustrious Royal Society. In which I. The present Deficiency of Natural Philosophy is discoursed of, with the Methods of rendering it more certain and beneficial. II. The Nature, Motion and Effects of Light are treated of, particularly that of the Sun and Comets. III. An Hypothetical Explication of Memory; how the Organs made use of by the Mind in its Operation may be Mechanically understood. IV. An Hypothesis and Explication of the cause of Gravity, or Gravitation, Magnetism, &c. V. Discourses of Earthquakes, their Causes and Effects, and Histories of several; to which are annext, Physical Explications of several of the Fables in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, very different from other Mythologick Interpreters. VI. Lectures for improving Navigation and Astronomy, with the Descriptions of several new and useful Instruments and Contrivances; the whole full of curious Disquisitions and Experiments. Illustrated with sculptures. To these discourses is prefixt the author’s life, giving an Account of his Studies and Employments, with an Enumeration of the many Experiments, Instruments, Contrivances and Inventions, by him made and produc’d as Curator of Experiments to the Royal Society. Publish’d by Richard Waller, R. S. Secr. London: Printed by Sam. Smith and Benj. Walford (printers to the Royal Society) at the Princes Arms in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, 1705. i–xxviii.

Walpole, Horace. Anecdotes of painting in England; with some account of the principal artists; and incidental notes on other arts; collected by the late Mr. George Vertue; and now digested and published from his original MSS. by Mr. Horace Walpole. The second edition. 4 vols. [Twickenham]: Printed by Thomas Kirgate at Strawberry-Hill, 1765.

Walpole, Horace. Anecdotes of painting in England; with some account of the principal artists; and incidental notes on other arts. Also, A catalogue of engravers who have been born or resided in England. Collected by the late George Vertue; digested and published from his original mss. by Horace Walpole; with additions by the Rev. James Dallaway. A new edition, revised, with additional notes. By Ralph N. Wornum. 3 vols. London: Henry G. Bohn, York Street, Covent Garden, 1862.

Walpole, Horace. A catalogue of engravers, who have been born, or resided in England; digested by Mr. Horace Walpole from the MSS. of Mr. George Vertue; to which is added An account of the life and works of the latter. [Twickenham]: Strawberry-Hill, printed in the year MDCCLXIII [1763].

Walpole, Horace. A catalogue of engravers, who have been born or resided in England; digested by Mr. Horace Walpole from the MSS. of Mr. George Vertue; to which is added An account of the life and works of the latter. The second edition. [Twickenham]: Strawberry-Hill, printed in the year MDCCLXV [1765].

Walpole, Horace. A catalogue of engravers. Twickenham: Strawberry-Hill, 1763. Rpt. in Anecdotes of painting in England; with some account of the principal artists; and incidental notes on other arts. Also, A catalogue of engravers who have been born or resided in England. Collected by the late George Vertue; digested and published from his original mss. by Horace Walpole; with additions by the Rev. James Dallaway. A new edition, revised, with additional notes. By Ralph N. Wornum. In three volumes. Vol. III. 1849; rpt. London: Henry G. Bohn, York Street, Covent Garden, 1862. 839–987.

Walpole, Horace. A catalogue of the royal and noble authors of England, with lists of their works. 2 vols. [Twickenham]: Printed at Strawberry-Hill, MDCCLVIII [1758].

Walpole, Horace, rev. by Thomas Park. A catalogue of the royal and noble authors of England, Scotland, and Ireland; with lists of their works: by the late Horatio Walpole, earl of Orford. Enlarged and continued to the present time, by Thomas Park, F.S.A. 5 vols. London: Printed for John Scott, No. 442, Strand, 1806.

Wentworth, Anne. The revelation of Jesus Christ: just as he spake it in verses at several times, and sometimes in prose, unto his faithful servant Anne Wentworth, who suffereth for his name. Containing mercy and judgment, comforts to Zion, but woes to Babylon. Published by a friend in love to souls, for the good of such as will receive and believe the truth. London, 1679.

A machine-readable transcription of Wentworth’s The Revelation of Jesus Christ, ed. and introd. by Vickie Taft, is available from the Emory Women Writers Resource Project.

Weston, Elizabeth Jane. Parthenicôn Elisabethæ Joannæ Westoniæ, virginis nobilissimæ, poëtriæ florentissimæ, linguarum plurimarum peritissimæ, Liber I. Operâ ac studio G. Mart. à Baldhoven, Sil. collectus; & nunc denuò amicis desiderantibus communicatus. Pragae: Typis Pauli Sessii, [1608?]. Rpt. in Elizabeth Jane Weston: Collected Writings. Ed. and trans. by Donald Cheney and Brenda M. Hosington, with D. K. Money. Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press, 2000. 2–99.

Weston, Elizabeth Jane. Parthenicôn Elisabethæ Joannæ Westoniæ Liber II. Operâ & studio G. Mart. à Baldhofen, editus. Pragae: Typis Pauli Sessii, [1608?]. Rpt. in Elizabeth Jane Weston: Collected Writings. Ed. and trans. by Donald Cheney and Brenda M. Hosington, with D. K. Money. Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press, 2000. 100–167.

Weston, Elizabeth Jane. Parthenicôn Elisabethæ Joannæ Westoniæ. Liber III. Operâ & studio G. Mart. à Baldhofen, Sil. collectus. Pragae: Typis Pauli Sessii, [1608?]. Rpt. in Elizabeth Jane Weston: Collected Writings. Ed. and trans. by Donald Cheney and Brenda M. Hosington, with D. K. Money. Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press, 2000. 168–303.

Weston, Elizabeth Jane. “Typographia” [“The Printing Press”] and “De & pro Typographis” [“On and for Printers”] from Parthenicôn Elisabethæ Joannæ Westoniæ, virginis nobilissimæ, poëtriæ florentissimæ, linguarum plurimarum peritissimæ, Liber I. Operâ ac studio G. Mart. à Baldhoven, Sil. collectus; & nunc denuò amicis desiderantibus communicatus. Pragae: Typis Pauli Sessii, [1608?]. Fol. D3r–D4v. Rpt. in Elizabeth Jane Weston: Collected Writings. Ed. and trans. by Donald Cheney and Brenda M. Hosington, with D. K. Money. Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press, 2000. 84–89.

An HTML transcription of Weston’s 2 poems on printing (Latin originals, and modern English translations) from Book 1 of her Parthenicôn ... Libri III [Maidenly Writings in Three Books] is available in the She-philosopher.com Library: see Lib. Cat. No. WEST1608.

Weyerman, Jacob Campo. De Levens-Beschryvingen der Nederlandsche Konst-Schilders en Konst-Schilderessen, met een uytbreyding over de schilder-konst der ouden, door Jacob Campo Weyerman, konst-schilder. Verrykt met de Konterfeytsels der Voornaamste Konst-Schilders en Konst-Schilderessen, cierlyk in koper gesnede door J. Houbraken. In ’s Gravenhage: By de Wed. E. Boucquet, H. Scheurleer, F. Boucquet, en J. de Jonghs, MDCCXXIX [1729].

Whitbourne, Richard. A discourse and discovery of New-found-land, with many reasons to proove how worthy and beneficiall a plantation may there be made, after a far better manner than now it is. Together with the laying open of certaine enormities and abuses commited by some that trade to that countrey, and the meanes laide downe for reformation thereof. Written by Captaine Richard Whitbourne of Exmouth, in the county of Devon, and published by authority. Imprinted at London: By Felix Kyngston, for William Barret, 1620.

Whitbourne, Richard. A discourse containing a loving invitation both honourable, and profitable to all such as shall be adventurers, either in person, or purse, for the advancement of his Majesties most hopefull plantation in the New-found-land, lately undertaken. Written by Captaine Richard Whitbourne of Exmouth, in the county of Devon. Imprinted at London: By Felix Kyngston, dwelling in Pater-noster-Row, 1622.

Whitehead, William A. East Jersey under the proprietary governments: a narrative of events connected with the settlement and progress of the province, until the surrender of the government to the crown in 1702 [i.e., 1703 NS]. Drawn principally from original sources. By William A. Whitehead. With an appendix, containing “The model of the government of East New-Jersey, in America,” by George Scot, of Pitlochie. Now first reprinted from the original edition of 1685. [New York]: New-Jersey Historical Society, 1846.

Whitlock, Richard. Zootomia, or, observations of the present manners of the English: briefly anatomizing the living by the dead. With an usefull detection of the mountebanks of both sexes. By Richard Whitlock, M.D. late fellow of All-Souls Colledge in Oxford. London: Printed by Tho. Roycroft, and are to be sold by Humphrey Moseley, at the Princes Armes in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1654.

Whitney, Geoffrey. A choice of emblemes, and other devises, for the moste parte gathered out of sundrie writers, Englished and moralized. And divers newly devised, by Geffrey Whitney. A worke adorned with varietie of matter, both pleasant and profitable: wherein those that please, maye finde to fit their fancies: bicause herein, by the office of the eie, and the eare, the minde maye reape dooble delighte throughe holsome preceptes, shadowed with pleasant devises: both fit for the vertuous, to their incoraging: and for the wicked, for their admonishing and amendment. Imprinted at Leyden: In the house of Christopher Plantyn, by Francis Raphelengius, M.D.LXXXVI [1586].

Wilkins, John. The discovery of a world in the moone. Or, a discourse tending to prove that ’tis probable there may be another habitable world in that planet. London: Printed by E. G. for Michael Sparke and Edward Forrest, 1638.

Wilkins, John. A discovery of a new world. Or, a discourse tending to prove ... another habitable world in the moon .... London, 1638. 5th edn. London: John Gellibrand, 1684.

Wilkins, John. An essay towards a real character, and a philosophical language. By John Wilkins D.D. Dean of Ripon, and Fellow of the Royal Society. London: Printed for Sa: Gellibrand, and for John Martyn printer to the Royal Society, 1668.

Wilkins, John. The mathematical and philosophical works of the Right Reverend John Wilkins, late Lord Bishop of Chester: to which is prefix’d the author’s life, and an account of his works. London: Printed for J. Nicholson [etc.], 1708.

Wilkins, John. Mathematicall magick, or, the wonders that may be performed by mechanicall geometry: in two books, concerning mechanicall powers, motions, being one of the most easie, pleasant, usefull (and yet most neglected) part of mathematicks, not before treated of in this language. London: Printed by M.F. for Sa. Gellibrand ..., 1648.

Williams, Edward. Virginia, more especially the south part thereof, richly and truly valued: viz. The fertile Carolana, and no lesse excellent isle of Roanoak, of latitude from 31 to 37 degr. relating the meanes of raysing infinite profits to the adventurers and planters. The second edition, with addition of The discovery of silkworms, with their benefit, and implanting of mulberry trees, also the dressing of vines, for the rich trade of making wines in Virginia, together with the making of the saw-mill, very usefull in Virginia, for cutting of timber and clapbord to build withall, and its conversion to many as profitable uses. By E.W. Gent. London: Printed by T.H. for John Stephenson, at the Signe of the Sun below Ludgate, 1650.

Williams, Edward. Virginia’s discovery of silke-wormes, with their benefit. And the implanting of mulberry trees. Also the dressing and keeping of vines, for the rich trade of making wines there. Together with the making of the saw-mill, very usefull in Virginia, for cutting of timber and clapbord, to build withall, and its conversion to other as profitable uses. London: Printed by T. H. for John Stephenson, at the Signe of the Sun, below Ludgate, 1650.

Willughby, Francis. Francisci Willughbeii de Midleton in agro Warwicensi, armigeri, e Regia Societate, Ornothologiæ libri tres: in quibus aves omnes hactenus cognitæ in methodum naturis suis convenientem redactæ accuratè describuntur, descriptiones iconibus elegantissimis & vivarum avium simillimis, æri incisis illustrantur. Totum opus recognovit, digessit, supplevit Joannes Raius. Sumptus in chalcographos fecit illustriss. d. Emma Willughby, vidua. Ed. by John Ray. Londini: Impensis Joannis Martyn, Regiæ Societatis typographi, ad insigne Campanæ in Cæmeterio d. Pauli, MDCLXXVI [1676].

Winstanley, Gerrard. The law of freedom in a platform: or, true magistracy restored. Humbly presented to Oliver Cromwel, General of the Common-wealths army in England, Scotland, and Ireland. And to all English-men my brethren whether in church-fellowship, or not in church-fellowship, both sorts walking as they conceive according to the order of the Gospel: and from them to all nations in the world. Wherein is declared, what is kingly government, and what is Commonwealths government. By Jerrard Winstanley. London: Printed for the author, and are to be sold by Giles Calvert at the black Spred-Eagle at the west end of Pauls, 1652.

Winstanley, Gerrard. A letter to the Lord Fairfax, and his Councell of War, with divers questions to the lawyers, and ministers: proving it an undeniable equity, that the common people ought to dig, plow, plant and dwell upon the commons, without hiring them, or paying rent to any. Delivered to the Generall and the chief officers on Saturday June 9. By Jerrard Winstanly, in the behalf of those who have begun to dig upon George-Hill in Surrey. London: Printed for Giles Calvert, at the black Spread-Eagle at the west end of Pauls, 1649.

Winstanley, Gerrard, et al. The true Levellers standard advanced: or, The state of community opened, and presented to the sons of men. By Ferrard [sic] Winstanley, William Everard, John Palmer, John South, John Courton, William Taylor, Christopher Clifford, John Barker, Richard Goodgroome, Thomas Starre, William Hoggrill, Robert Sawyer, Thomas Eder, Henry Bickerstaffe, John Taylor, &c. Beginning to plant and manure the waste land upon George-Hill, in the parish of Walton, in the county of Surrey. London: Printed in the yeer, MDCXLIX [1649].

[Wolley, Hannah.] The Accomplish’d lady’s delight in preserving, physick, beautifying, and cookery. Containing, I. The art of preserving and candying fruits & flowers, and the making of all sorts of conserves, syrups, and jellies. II. The physical cabinet, or, excellent receipts in physick and chirurgery; together with some rare beautifying waters, to adorn and add loveliness to the face and body: and also some new and excellent secrets and experiments in the art of angling. III. The compleat cooks guide, or, directions for dressing all sorts of flesh, fowl, and fish, both in the English and French mode, with all sauces and sallets; and the making pyes, pasties, tarts, and custards, with the forms and shapes of many of them. Ed. by T. P. London: Printed for B. Harris, and are to be sold at his shop, at the Stationers Arms in Swithins Rents by the Royall Exchange, 1675.

This anonymous work was spuriously attributed to the best-selling author, Hannah Wolley (alias Woolley), as the bookseller intended. First issued in 1675, The Accomplish’d Lady’s Delight was reprinted twice in 1677, and again in 1683, 1684, 1685, 1686, and 1696. A woman, Sarah Harris, published The Sixth Edition Enlarged of 1686.
   The two other unauthorized works misattributed to Hannah Wolley by 17th-century booksellers, who profited from the deception, were: The Gentlewomans Companion (1st edn., 1673) and The Compleat Servant-Maid (1st edn., 1677).

[Wolley, Hannah.] The compleat servant-maid; or, The young maidens tutor. Directing them how they may fit, and qualifie themselves for any of these employments. Viz. Waiting woman, house-keeper, chamber-maid, cook-maid, under cook-maid, nursery-maid, dairy-maid, laundry-maid, house-maid, scullery-maid. Composed for the great benefit and advantage of all young maidens. London: printed for T. Passinger, at the Three Bibles on London Bridge, 1677.

This anonymous work (1st edn., 1677) was spuriously attributed to the best-selling author, Hannah Wolley (alias Woolley), as the bookseller intended. Frequently reprinted, a Sixth Edition with Additions appeared in 1700, and there was at least one more issue of The Compleat Servant-Maid during the 18th century (in 1704).
   The two other unauthorized works misattributed to Hannah Wolley by 17th-century booksellers, who profited from the deception, were: The Gentlewomans Companion (1st edn., 1673) and The Accomplish’d Lady’s Delight (1st edn., 1675).

Wolley, Hannah. The cook’s guide: or, Rare receipts for cookery. Published and set forth particularly for ladies and gentlwomen; being very beneficial for all those that desire the true way of dressing of all sorts of flesh, fowles, and fish; the best directions for all manner of kickshaws, and the most ho-good sawces: whereby noble persons and others in their hospitalities may be gratified in their gusto’s. Never before printed. By Hannah Wolley. London: [P]rinted for Peter Dring at the Sun in the Poultry, next door to the Rose-Tavern, 1664.

Wolley, Hannah. The gentlewomans companion; or, A guide to the female sex containing directions of behaviour, in all places, companies, relations, and conditions, from their childhood down to old age: viz. As, children to parents. Scholars to governours. Single to servants. Virgins to suitors. Married to husbands. Huswifes to the house Mistresses to servants. Mothers to children. Widows to the world Prudent to all. With letters and discourses upon all occasions. Whereunto is added, a guide for cook-maids, dairy-maids, chamber-maids, and all others that go to service. The whole being an exact rule for the female sex in general. By Hannah Woolley. London: printed by A. Maxwell for Dorman Newman at the Kings-Arms in the Poultry, 1673.

This unauthorized work was spuriously attributed to the best-selling author, Hannah Wolley (alias Woolley), by publisher Dorman Newman, who prefaced it with a misleading portrait of Sarah Gilly, sometimes wrongly inscribed Hannah Wooley. To complete the bookseller’s hoax, “A Short Account of the Life and Abilities of the Authoress of this Book” was included with The Gentlewomans Companion, giving unreliable biographical information about Wolley which has been too often accepted as truth by readers, including scholars. Of note, the 1st edn. of 1673 and 2nd edn. of 1675 were both printed by a woman, Anne Maxwell (who also printed works by Margaret Cavendish).
   The two other unauthorized works misattributed to Hannah Wolley by 17th-century booksellers, who profited from the imposturing deceit, were: The Accomplish’d Lady’s Delight (1st edn., 1675) and The Compleat Servant-Maid (1st edn., 1677).

Wolley, Hannah. The ladies delight: or, A rich closet of choice experiments & curiosities, containing the art of preserving & candying both fruits and flowers: together with The great cook; or, The art of dressing all sorts of flesh, fowl, and fish. By Hannah Woolley. To which is added: The ladies physical closet: or, Excellent receipts, and rare waters for beautifying the face and body. London: Printed by T. Milbourn, for N. Crouch, in Exchange-Alley over against the Royal-Exchange in Cornhil, 1672.

Wolley, Hannah. The ladies directory, in choice experiments & curiosities of preserving in jellies, and candying both fruits & flowers. Also, an excellent way of making cakes, comfits, and rich court-perfumes. With rarities of many precious waters; among which, are Doctor Stephens’s water, Dr. Matthias’s palsie-water; and an excellent water against the plague: with severall consumption drinks, approved of by the ablest physicians. By Hanna Wolley, who hath had the honour to perform such things for the entertainment of his late majesty, as well as for the nobility. London: Printed by T. M. for Peter Dring, at the Sun, next dore to the Rose Taverne in the Poultry, 1662.

Wolley, Hannah. The queen-like closet; or, Rich cabinet: stored with all manner of rare receipts for preserving, candying & cookery. Very pleasant and beneficial to all ingenious persons of the female sex. By Hannah Wolley. London: Printed for R. Lowndes at the White Lion in Duck-Lane, near West-Smithfield, 1670.

Wolley, Hannah. A supplement to The queen-like closet; or, A little of everything. Presented to all ingenious ladies, and gentlewomen. By Hanna Woolley. London: Printed by T. R. for Richard Lownds, and are to be sold at the Sign of the White Lion in Duck-Lane, 1674.

Wood, Anthony. Athenae Oxonienses. An exact history of all the writers and bishops who have had their education in the most ancient and famous University of Oxford, from the fifteenth year of King Henry the Seventh, dom. 1500, to the end of the year 1690. Representing the birth, fortune, preferment, and death of all those authors and prelates, the great accidents of their lives, and the fate and character of their writings. To which are added, the Fasti, or, Annals, of the said university, for the same time. 2 vols. London: Printed for Tho. Bennet at the Half-Moon in S. Pauls Churchyard, 1691–1692.

Wood, Anthony. The life and times of Anthony Wood, antiquary, of Oxford, 1632–1695, described by himself. Collected from his diaries and other papers by Andrew Clark ... Volume II: 1654–1681. With illustrations. Oxford: Printed for the Oxford Historical Society at the Clarendon Press, 1892.

Wright, Edward. Certaine errors in nauigation, arising either of the ordinarie erroneous making or vsing of the sea chart, compasse, crosse staffe, and tables of declination of the sunne, and fixed starres detected and corrected. By E. W. Printed at London: By Valentine Sims [and W. White], 1599.

Wright, Edward. Certain errors in navigation. Detected and corrected by Edw. Wright. With many additions that were not in the former editions. London: Printed by Joseph Moxon, and sold at his shop at the Atlas on Cornhill, 1657.

Ornament from the Supplement to Chambers' _Cyclopaedia_ (1753)

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